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by Tim Regan — June 22, 2015 at 12:45 pm 340 0

Plan B Gallery, photo via Plan B Gallery

Local artists now have one less place in which to hang their work.

Gallery Plan B owner Paula Amt and director David Kalamar announced in a Facebook post yesterday that the gallery located across the street from the Studio Theatre is closed for good.

Amt confirmed the closure earlier today via e-mail.

“We are closing, not moving,” said Amt. “Our last exhibition finished yesterday and we will be out of the space by the end of the month.”

“We decided after the 10 year anniversary that it was time,” added Amt. “Go out on a high note with good memories and accomplishments.”

The business, which opened a decade ago on the first floor of 1530 14th Street NW, had been a popular exhibition space for local photographers, painters and sculptors.

Amt said a new art-themed business would open in the space later this summer, but would not offer any additional details.

Photo via GalleryPlanB.com

by Bryan Doyle — June 18, 2015 at 9:00 am 0

STOCK-26

K-9 Tragedy — Romo, the beloved bull mastiff/pit bull mix and unofficial mascot of Adams Morgan, is leaving the neighborhood for Arlington. [NBC Washington]

Red Onion Revival — Sadly, Romo wasn’t the only loss for the 18th Street area. Red Onion Records is leaving too; luckily, the popular record store is moving close by on U Street NW. [Borderstan]

Cool Map Bro — A couple of adventures in D.C. mapping today. First, a look at all the D.C. outdoor art projects throughout the city. [Bad Wolf DC]

Housing Legacy of Segregation — Our next map is more academic, and it’s worth a read. It focuses on the efforts of historians Sarah Shoenfeld and Mara Cherkasky as they document, block by block, the historical ramifications of segregation in the district. [Park View DC]

by Laetitia Brock — June 1, 2015 at 1:10 pm 0

U Street is paying homage to american actor, singer and civil rights activist Paul Robeson with “Living Timeline,” a new mural currently in the works on the 1300 blocks of U Street NW.

ART B.L.O.C is an art collective founded by Cory Stowers. As reported by the Washington Post, the collective received a $50,000 city grant from the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities to paint the tribute on the side of the Hung Tao Choy Mei Leadership Institute at 1351 U Street NW. The work looks almost complete.

Currently, two large portraits of Robeson occupy the two opposite ends of the dark grey wall. Between them, a series of seven round vignettes depicting Robeson at various stages of his life are scattered throughout the wall.

Above the vignettes, passers-by can read a quote widely attributed to Robeson:  “I make no distinction between my work as an artist and my life as a human being.” According to drawings and plans for the mural, the vignettes still need to be linked by a timeline, with important dates in the life of Robeson.

An interactive component of the mural will allow Washingtonians to scan a photo of the mural into an app on their phone to gain access to stories of the different stages of Robeson’s life included in the timeline.

My favorite is the last one, which depicts him in front of the Eiffel Tower, a reference to the trip he took to France to attend the Soviet Union-sponsored Paris Peace Conference.

This will be the second tribute to Paul Robeson in the city. “(Here I Stand) In the Spirit of Paul Robeson,” a public artwork by artist Allen Uzikee Nelson, can currently be seen at the intersection of Kansas Avenue and Georgia Avenue NW, in Petworth.

Laetitia Brock grew up in Paris and landed in D.C. to get her masters at George Washington University. During the day, she works for a trade association near Thomas Circle, but in the evening and on the weekends, she loves discovering new street art around town and exploring the district’s bustling restaurant scene. In addition to contributing to Borderstan, she writes about her favorite DC spots for the travel website Spotted by Locals, and on her own blog, FrenchTwistDC.

Follow her on twitter at @laetitiabrock.

by Tim Regan — June 1, 2015 at 10:30 am 0

Caped crusaders, local artists, and a smattering of celebrities packed the Walter E. Washington convention for Awesome Con last Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Ask one of the self-proclaimed geeks in attendance and they’ll all probably say the same thing: It was, well, awesome.

For many, the convention was a rare chance to embody a favorite character. Shaw and Foggy Bottom residents Andy Hill and Aaron Roenthal showed up as Street Fighter characters Guile and Zangief. Carlie Anne Peña, who lives in Columbia Heights, dressed as Jubilee from the X-Men.

“It’s my midlife crisis,” says Rich Willet from Sterling, Va. “Instead of buying a corvette, I bought a bat suit.”

For Matt Klokel, owner of Fantom Comics in Dupont Circle, Awesome Con is a yearly pilgrimage. “You can’t be a priest in the Catholic church and, when the pope comes to down, say, ‘eh, I’ll catch him later,'” he says. “This is why I got into comics. I love conventions.”

Local cartoonists Carolyn Belefski and Theresa Logan exhibited their work in artist alley. “It’s important to be here if you’re a D.C. area creator,” says Belefski, who illustrates and writes the webcomic Curls. “D.C. has a comic presence and it’s building heavily. Thanks to Awesome Con, we can have a bigger presence.”

“And it keeps growing,” adds Logan. “There are so many different cartoonists, comic artists, sequential artists here.”

But it wasn’t just comic book artists that showed up. One of the more heavily frequented booths belonged to the upcoming Museum of Science Fiction, where exhibitors set up an Oculus Rift so attendees could preview the museum in 3-D virtual reality.

“It’s D.C.’s Comic-Con,” says Museum of Science Fictions executive director, Greg Viggiano. “There is definitely a component of the museum that has a Comic-Con quality to it. On that basis, it’s pretty important that we be here.”

by Borderstan.com — April 18, 2013 at 12:00 pm 3,106 0

"Arts"

DC Advocates for the Arts. (Courtesy DC Advocates for the Arts)

From ArtSee. Email contact[AT]artseedc.com and follow ArtSee @ArtSeeinDC on Twitter.

This week is all about the arts in DC, or it should be.  Just yesterday was Arts Advocacy Day, a day dedicated to supporting and celebrating the arts. As previously posted, many organizations were a small piece of the day, but there is one that is mobilizing the efforts to encourage people in DC to do more to increase arts funding and garner additional support from law makers. DC Advocates for the Arts, a non-profit organization that exists to support public policy on the participation of the arts within the DC community at large, is one of them.

Recently, DC Advocates for the Arts has ramped up their mailings to entice people to give back to their cause, increasing arts funding, by writing to their local government officials, including the mayor. In this plea, it states the fundamental issue with the proposed mayoral budget or 2013;

“The mayor’s recently proposed budget cuts arts funding by $6 million dollars. The DC Arts Commission is amongst the smallest agencies in the city, and while some agencies could easily absorb a $6 million dollar cut, this would cut DC’s arts agency in half.”

The group is asking for additional funding to the tune of $11 million dollars, a sum we think should be obtainable. In order or this to happen though, lawmakers and DC will have to continue making the arts a priority. DC Advocates for the Arts also has a brand new website where you can find additional information about their efforts and how to write a letter of your own to support an increase in arts funding, click here for more details.

Bringing the Art in DC to You – Roxanne Goldberg

"Artsee"

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by Borderstan.com — April 12, 2013 at 4:00 pm 0

"ArtJamz"

ArtJamz Bazaar, Sunday April 14, on Connecticut Avenue NW. (Luis Gomez Photos)

What can be better than art? Well, a local art bazaar. ArtJamz, that wonderful and creative place, will be hosting an Artz Bazaar, Sunday, April 14, from noon to 4 pm at its studio. ArtJamz recently moved to a new location at  1728 Connecticut Avenue NW. They will be showcasing the works of local professional artists.

“ArtJamz is more than just painting and drinking; we’re here to support the Washington DC metro arts scene,” said Chief Creative Enabler Michael M. Clements. “We feel we can do that by giving our team of ArtJamz Creative Enablers as well as local artists a chance to showcase and sell their work at our Dupont Studio.”

Pieces are priced between $35 and $500, but the event is free. Come early and meet the artists, listen to the music, enjoy the wine and beer and buy art.

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by Borderstan.com — March 27, 2013 at 2:00 pm 0

From Allison Acosta. Email her at allison[AT]borderstan.com.

"Artspace"

ArtSpace at 6th and S Streets NW. (Allison Acosta)

In the basement of the New Community Church at 6th and S Streets NW, ArtSpace DC has offered local residents from all walks of life the opportunity to develop their artistic talents for more than a decade.

ArtSpace’s mission is to act as a “conduit for personal and community expression, empowering participants to find their artistic voice, celebrate the beauty of the world that surrounds us and expose what needs to change with powerful visual statements.”

The church has served the Shaw community for nearly 30 years. In 1984, they purchased what was then an abandoned and dilapidated property on a block known for drug deals from the DC Government. With help from church members, neighbors, and Manna, a non-profit that renovates and builds affordable housing founded by the church’s leader, the Reverend Jim Dickerson, the property was restored and reopened to the community.

In 1999 Rachel Dickerson Brunswick, Dickerson’s daughter, returned to Washington, DC after studying the visual arts in college. Shaw community members, seeing how much their children enjoyed the arts in the church’s after school program, decided they wanted a space of their own to explore their creative sides. Artspace was opened, and volunteer artists have offered affordable classes to the community ever since.

“It really is a community-based setting, and I think that’s what appeals to a lot of people,” says Brunswick. “It’s a mix of people that we’ve always had. And the people that come around are really interesting. Everybody’s got a story.”

Maybelle Taylor Bennett has offered a popular fiber arts class from the very beginning, offering instruction in weaving on any of several looms as well as knitting and crochet. Artspace is also host to a ceramics class and offers students access to three electric potter’s wheels and a kick wheel, as well as a kiln. Artspace offers Open Studio nights on Mondays.

Spring classes are now forming. Artspace has recently added a black and white darkroom and a darkroom class begins March 21. The newest addition to the class schedule is a Toddler Open Studio Class for young children and their caregivers being offered Mondays at 10am starting April 1.

Volunteers and donations of art supplies are always welcome at ArtSpace. The space has hosted cooking classes and workshops, bookmaking classes, yoga classes, acoustic musical performances, art exhibitions, and movie screenings. You can sign up for a class of for the email list at dc.artspace[AT]gmail.com.

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by Borderstan.com — March 15, 2013 at 10:00 am 0

"art"

“Pump Me Up” is at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Eliza French. Follow her on Twitter @elizaenbref; email her at eliza[AT]borderstan.com.

Museums, galleries and critics across the country are showcasing works by outsider artists, pulling the movement out of obscurity and into the mainstream.

Outsider art is art created by people without formal training who don’t consider themselves professionals and who operate outside the realm of the art world establishment.

It encompasses work by the mentally ill or the developmentally disabled and is often inspired by an artist’s own fantasy world or personal memories, but also by pop culture, religion and local subcultures. Outsider artists often use unconventional materials and found objects.

Mingering Mike, "The Outsiders featuring The Big "D": The Outsiders Are Back (Sex Records)," 1971.

Mingering Mike, “The Outsiders featuring The Big “D”: The Outsiders Are Back (Sex Records),” 1971. Now part of the Smithsonian American Art’ Museum’s collection.

Now in its 21st year, the most recent annual “Outsider Art Fair” in New York received an “unprecedented amount of press coverage” and record-breaking attendance. The Philadelphia Museum of Art opened its “Great and Mighty Things” exhibit of outsider art earlier this month.

The Smithsonian American Art Museum’s recent acquisition of works by Mingering Mike should dispel any doubts that outsider art has found a place in the contemporary art historical canon. A recent Washington Post article details how the museum came to acquire the works, and gives as much information as possible on the person behind the Mingering Mike moniker.

Outsider art also features prominently in many spring museum exhibits and gallery openings here in DC.

Mumbo Sauce,” curated by Lauren Gentile of Contemporary Wing and Bethesda native Roger Gastman, opens April 5 at an as yet undisclosed location. Gastman also curated the Corcoran Gallery of Art’s popular “Pump Me Up: D.C. Subculture of the 1980s” exhibit that features graffiti art by Cool “Disco” Dan, among others, posters, and ephemera from the 1980s DC musical sub-cultures. “Mumbo Sauce,” created “in response to” the Corcoran exhibit, includes pieces by Mingering Mike, Cool “Disco” Dan, BORF and others.

Art Enables, a non-profit that supports local artists with disabilities and that works to foster a wider appreciation of contemporary folk art, opened the “Glitterbomb” exhibit in its Off-Rhode Gallery on March 3. (Click here to view a slideshow of photos works from “Glitterbomb” on the Huffington Post.) All of the works in the exhibit come from Art Enable board member Paul Yandura’s personal collection. Programming for the exhibit includes a Gliteratti Party on Saturday, March 23, and a Collector’s Talk with Yandura on Wednesday, March 27.

The English-language term outsider art can be traced back to the concept of l’art brut. Jean Dubufett, one of three artists featured in “Angels, Demons, and Savages” at The Phillips Collection, was the first to use the term art brut and amassed a large collection of art brut works during his lifetime. A talk at The Phillips on March 28 will explore Dubuffet’s relation to art brut and its influence on his work.

Details

  • Pump Me Up” at Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th Street NW, runs through April 7.
  • Glitterbomb” at Off-Rhode Gallery, 2204 Rhode Island Avenue NE, runs through March 29.
  • Mumbo Sauce” opens April 5 at an as yet undisclosed location.

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by Borderstan.com — July 31, 2012 at 5:00 pm 0

"Contemporary Wing"

Contemporary Wing at 1412 14th Street NW. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Eliza French. Follow her on Twitter @elizaenbref; email her at eliza[AT]borderstan.com.

From now through next Saturday, August 4, “Off the Wall: Established Contemporary,” is on view at Contemporary Wing, 1412 14th Street NW.  The small, carefully curated showing at Contemporary Wing features work by some of the most well-known contemporary artists.

The show’s 10 works include pieces by Nan Golding, Kara Walker, Shinique Smith, Andy Warhol and Young British Artists Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin. Lauren Gentile sourced the wide range of works from private collections in Washington, DC and New York City.

"Contemporay Wing, Andy Warhol, "Endangered Species: Bald Eagle"

Andy Warhol, “Endangered Species: Bald Eagle”. (Photo by Eliza French)

A print from Andy Warhol’s “Endangered Species” series and a Damien Hirst woodcut, “Quinaldi Acid,” serve as larger scale anchors for the group of mostly smaller pieces. The vivid cibachrome prints by Nan Goldin (like “Toon, So, and Yogo on Stage,” the image used in the marketing materials for the show) also serve as a visual touchstone, drawing the viewer into the worlds occupied by her subjects.

The two most diminutive works in the gallery — Kara Walker’s “Untitled, Swimmer,” a delicately rendered gouache on paper, and Tracey Emin’s “Untitled, Nude,” graphite on paper — offer more subtle but equally compelling visual experiences.

The next installment, “Off the Wall: Street Art,” will run from August 16 to 25 and will feature works by Shepard Fairey, Faile, Blek Le Rat, James Marshall (Dalek),WK Interact and Gary Baseman. The opening reception is Thursday, August 16, from 6 to 8 pm.

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by Borderstan.com — October 21, 2011 at 8:00 am 0

Dupont Circle, Logan Circle, U Street NW, Borderstan

News from Dupont-Logan-U Street.

From Michelle Lancaster. Follow her and tell her your news on Twitter @MichLancaster or email her at [email protected].

Kwame Brown Gets Fully Blasted

Chuck Thies minces no words when it comes to his feelings regarding the work performance of DC Council Chair Kwame Brown in this article, found in Georgetown Dish. The short story is this: Brown tweeted a picture about real change occurring when politicians were making minimum wage; Thies takes issue with this tweet and Brown’s $190,000 a year salary. But the short story barely covers the list Thies assembled of items that have yet to be answered or delivered by Brown on his more-than-minimum-wage salary.

Riding and Running

As someone who was once a college student, I’m familiar with the ‘dine and dash.’ As someone who worked tables while in college, I curse this ‘prank.’ Turns out I’m not the only one — taxi drivers lambasted the number of passengers that get a ride, then ditch the fare. In DCist’s coverage of the hearing at the DC Taxicab Commission, a number of drivers said the problem was widespread and had gotten worse since meters were installed. We all know that the zone system allowed some abuses in the amount charged, but if this is widespread, then yes, the city should be acting. That’s apparently the plan, as the Commissioner has asked for cabbies to submit testimony documenting the occasions.

Contemporary Wing Announces 14th Street Addy

The gallery Contemporary Wing has secured a sought-after 14th Street NW location, at 1412 14th Street. The location was announced ahead of the planned November 1 announcement on their website (we got an email note). The space is leased from Lori Graham Design and Contemporary Wing will have the front exhibition area. They plan to open in mid-November and we’ll let you know when you can go check it out.

Reeves Center: Unfitting Memorial to Civil Rights Great?

It is hard to imagine that a man who fought for school desegregation, worked with JFK on minority affairs and broke color barriers in DC politics would be pleased with his namesake building, the Frank D. Reeves Center on U Street NW. While it’s a fine building from an aesthetic perspective, the pictures say a million words in this Washington City Paper exploration of the building. The accompanying text is plenty powerful, though, and documents a building that is in need of repair and some oversight. Councilman Jim Graham can’t be pleased at the investigation Loose Lips took into an area called his constituent service area, which is being used by the All Faith Consortium instead of Graham.

Lincoln Theatre Counterpoint

Eli Lehrer has graced this page before due to his Huffington Post blog on why DC isn’t a great food city (and several readers agreed). Now he’s back, to take on an equally contentious topic involving whether the city should let the Lincoln Theatre wither. His take? The Lincoln is a “white elephant” that may “hurt the ability of the area to emerge as a stronger arts destination.” The stance may be unpopular, but it is guided by a sentiment shared by many owners and patrons of the arts. Government restrictions on noise combined with rent make U Street a tough place to preserve and grow a robust jazz scene. I still am not sure I agree with the idea that Crystal City has more jazz on Saturday than U Street, though. Someone, do the math!

Puppy Halloween Pictures

Sorry for a bummer of a Stuff for the second Friday in a row. After you’ve read Laura’s column and decided where to get real boozy with it this weekend, shake off that Friday malaise/hangover with some really cute dogs in some cute and some questionable Halloween costumes from the Washingtonian. If you can do better, send me your pics and we’ll figure out some puppy power prizes.

by Borderstan.com — March 21, 2009 at 11:03 pm 0

paulaplanbGallery plan b in Borderstan at 1530 14th Street NW is hosting an April 1 reception and poetry reading to recognize student work from the Printmaking Department of Corcoran College of Art & Design. Students’ work in oil and water are on display at gallery plan b through April 5.

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by Borderstan.com — March 7, 2009 at 2:30 pm 0

khayat

Marwan Khayat is a painter who lives in Borderstan. (Photo: Wiser with Art Blog.)

Meet Borderstan artist Marwan Khayat, a painter. (He says he is a physical therapist in his “real life.”) Here is how Khayat describes himself and his painting on his blog, Wiser with Art:

I moved to Washington DC from Israel several years ago. Living in Dupont neighborhood had a very positive impact on my ability and desire to paint more and to become an artist. I guess if categorized, I would fall into the undiscovered, self-taught artist, Israeli, Palestinian, Arab, Christian or any combination of the above.

Continue reading about Khayat and see photos of his paintings on his blog.

I first found out that Khayat was a painter after meeting him and his wife with their dog. (You learn a lot about your neighbors when you have a dog.) Are you a Borderstan artist with work to share? Do you know someone in Borderstan we can feature? Send an email to [email protected].

by Borderstan.com — January 19, 2009 at 6:44 pm 0

Plan B Gallery is in Borderstan at 1530 14th Street NW.

Michelle and Barack Obama are featured in the window of Gallery plan b in Borderstan.

paulaplanb

Paula owns Gallery plan b at 1530 14th Street NW.

Gallery plan b on 14th Street NW was ready today for the Inauguration. From plan b’s Web site:

Gallery plan b, located in the exciting Fourteenth Street arts corridor, provides a casual, hip space for a dynamic group of both established and emerging local artists to show and sell their art. Plan b presents both group and solo shows for:

  • Paintings
  • Photography
  • Drawings
  • Prints
  • Sculpture

by Borderstan.com — January 16, 2009 at 7:32 am 2 Comments

Corcoran Gallery of Art--"Portraits of Power," a collection of Richard Avedon photographs, closes January 25.

Corcoran Gallery of Art–“Portraits of Power,” a collection of Richard Avedon photographs, closes January 25. (Photo: Luis Gomez, One Photograph A Day.)

Just my opinion, but there are two things that are must-see. One is the photography exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery and the other is a movie.

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