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“Wall to Wall: A Canvas Over Time” at Peruvian Embassy

by Borderstan.com February 4, 2011 at 6:22 pm 0

Miki Fernandez Embassy of Peru Keri Douglas Borderstan

Miki Fernandez’s exhibition at the Embassy of Peru runs through February 11. The embassy is at 17th and Massachusetts NW. (Photo from Keri Douglas)

From Keri Douglas. She is a writer, photographer and strategic ommunications consultant who lives in Logan Circle. She recently reviewed “Pared-a-Pared: Un Lienzo a lo largo del tiempo” (“Wall to Wall: A Canvas Over Times”) at the Embassy of Peru. The embassy is located at 17th and Massachusetts NW and the exhibition is on view through February 11.

Miki Fernandez’s art explodes to the surface with color, energy, texture and messages from overlooked and forgotten elements of cities around the world. In the “Wall to Wall” exhibit at the Embassy of Peru, Fernandez reveals the ephemeral nature of life in abstracts that resemble the great masters of Joan Miro, Jackson Pollack and Mark Rothko.

“This is who I am. This is where I find peace. In a sense this is my own therapy — connecting to myself, people, my love to talk and travel. Art allows me to communicate.”

Fernandez is a visual poet using a canvas and time to tell the stories of his journey from Peru to America.  His colors are vibrant, passionate, calming, screaming and kinetic.

As Miki explained, “A wall is a canvas. Time is the artist. As time goes by, the wall becomes a living canvas.” Affected by weather, vandals, other posters layered on top and even neglect, walls tell tales, stories, a history. Fernandez excels at bringing order to the perceived chaos of abstract art.

A set of thickly painted colored doors stand alone in the center of the exhibit like a screen, a movie screen, replaying memories of the past, while still making room for new names, new expressions.

Even if one is blind it would be impossible not to imagine and feel the energy leaping off his canvas. Touching the wall of doors, one feels the cervices etched in globs of paint, the smooth glass pebbles pasted on the walls or even the biting beer cans crushed on the panel dedicated to an old military friend who suffered after fighting so many wars only to return home to commit suicide.

Fernandez discovers art in unexpected places — a floor tile, a poorly plastered wall junction, even noticing the layers of peeling paint. One photo is of a faded yellow sign on U Street. He visited the sign frequently over the years to witness the changes. The letters are barely visible. Stepping forward, looking closer, the invisible words become visible, reading “No Trespassing.”

A crisis was a turning point of his career. Responding to a friend in need, Fernandez was challenged to create more art than originally planned. It was at this point, Fernandez realized, “This is who I am.  This is where I find peace. In a sense this is my own therapy — connecting to myself, people, my love to talk and travel. Art allows me to communicate.”

Miki Fernandez Embassy of Peru Keri Douglas Borderstan

Miki Fernandez and his work. (Photo from Keri Douglas)

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