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All Souls Church to Host Gentrification Discussion Wednesday

by Tim Regan — May 23, 2016 at 4:00 pm 0

Capital DilemmaThe writers of a recent book on gentrification in D.C. will meet at All Souls Unitarian Church (2835 16th St. NW) this week to talk economic inequality, racism and class divides in the District.

Co-editor Dr. Sabiyha Prince and three of the book’s contributors — Dr. Maurice Jackson (Georgetown University), Dr. Johanna Bockman (George Mason University), and Dr. Bell Julian Clement (George Washington University) — will discuss the book, which is titled Capital Dilemma, at the church this Wednesday at 7 p.m.

“Gentrification, inequality, racism and class divides are defining qualities of the everyday experience of communities in Washington D.C.,” reads a Facebook post for the event. “Capital Dilemma is an amazing work by academics and intellectuals of the DMV area that helps us understand these experiences and fight to change them.”

Read more about Capital Dilemma from the Facebook event page:

Gentrification, inequality, racism and class divides are defining qualities of the everyday experience of communities in Washington, DC. Capital Dilemma is an amazing work by academics and intellectuals of the DMV area that helps us understand these experiences and fight to change them.

Come hear one of the co-editors of the book, Dr. Sabiyha Prince, discuss the crucial take-aways of the book with three of the contributors: Dr. Maurice Jackson (Georgetown University), Dr. Johanna Bockman (George Mason University), and Dr. Bell Julian Clement (George Washington University).

Capital Dilemma: Growth and Inequality in Washington, DC uncovers and explains the dynamics that have influenced the contemporary economic advancement of Washington, DC. This volume’s unique interdisciplinary approach using historical, sociological, anthropological, economic, geographic, political, and linguistic theories and approaches, captures the comprehensive factors related to changes taking place in one of the world’s most important cities.

Capital Dilemma clarifies how preexisting urban social hierarchies, established mainly along race and class lines but also along national and local interests, are linked with the city’s contemporary inequitable growth. While accounting for historic disparities, this book reveals how more recent federal and city political decisions and circumstances shape contemporary neighborhood gentrification patterns, highlighting the layered complexities of the modern national capital and connecting these considerations to Washington, DC’s past as well as to more recent policy choices.

Book cover via Amazon

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