by Tim Regan — October 2, 2015 at 2:15 pm 0

Amanda Bonam

ANC 1B has a another new commissioner.

The commission applauded Amanda Bonam, 1B-10, as she took her new seat during a general meeting at the Reeves Center last night.

Bonam, a 19-year-old student at Howard University, said she’s glad to take over for previous 1B-10 commissioner and Howard alum Allyson Carpenter.

“[Allyson and I] came to ANC meetings, we checked it out and it was something I was really interested in,” Bonam said. “Once I realized Allyson was on her way out, I thought that would be a natural step up, to run for the seat.”

Bonam added that she hopes to use her seat to connect the university and surrounding residents.

“As the newest commissioner, something that I think is absolutely important is connecting Howard University back with he community,” Bonam said. “I represent most of the Howard dormitories, so making sure that Howard and the community are connected is really important to me.”


by Tim Regan — September 28, 2015 at 12:15 pm 0

Candidate Holly Biglow touched upon the St. Thomas Church development project in her speech

Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B is getting ready for a special election.

Residents Holly Biglow and John Kupcinski have entered into a race for former commissioner Justine Underhill’s 2B-07 seat, which was vacated in August when Underhill moved to New York City. Earlier this month, you heard from Kupcinski. Now, here’s your chance to hear from Biglow:

Borderstan: Tell me a little bit about why you decided to run for the 2B-07 seat.

I’ve been in the neighborhood for six years. I love the neighborhood. I love my community. I love the diversity. I love what my neighborhood stands for. I want to be apart of it. I am apart of my condominium association, so I do like being involved however I can, especially regarding where I live.

You previously thought about running for this seat, didn’t you?

When Justine [Underhill] ran, I was also interested, but I met and I spoke to her and I didn’t go through with getting signatures or anything like that.

So you didn’t run, but you were thinking about it.

Exactly. I was just interested, but I met with her and she was very passionate about it, so I sort of stepped back.

If you are elected, what will be one of your first priorities?

I know the St. Thomas Church project is a very large project. It’s very important to the community, so that will be the number one issue that will have to be addressed.

After that, I would like to work closely or continue to work with the surrounding businesses, such as the restaurants. I know there’s a lot more competition in D.C., which is driving a lot of patrons to go to different parts of D.C. I want to try to keep our area vibrant and as active as it currently it. I would definitely like to work more to try to keep the businesses in our area.

I think congestion will be addressed eventually. Traffic congestion. I’m not sure about people congestion, but I know that is a concern, especially considering the St. Thomas street project and some of the other condos that are being developed in the neighborhood, such as the Patterson House. That’s one of the things I would definitely like to keep an eye out on.

In what ways would you work with the businesses to keep patrons here?

I know that normally the businesses come to the ANC to get approval on their patios or what they can and can’t do in terms of their liquor license, or can they play music or not? I think just sort of working in that regard and being open-minded and looking in a business sense to make sure that I’m helping them to thrive and keep customers coming into our neighborhood.

I do know that the ANC scope is limited, but when they approach the ANC with things they might want to do to boost their business, instead of saying no, [I want to] look at it more like, we do want to keep people coming into the neighborhood, how can we work together and keep the neighborhood thriving?

How do you plan to interact with other neighborhood associations, if elected?

Like I said in my speech at the last ANC meeting, I’m a very open-minded person. I like working with different organizations and coalitions. That would continue with any association if I were elected to the ANC.

How would you use social media to engage with your potential future constituents?

I’m a Facebook user. I would probably use Facebook and keep people updated through Facebook. That would be my route.

Is there anything you’d want to change in the way ANC 2B operates?

Nothing that I can pinpoint right now. But I feel like the commissioners are easy to work with and they’re very nice people. I’m sure if something did come about, they would probably consider my suggestions if there’s anything that I think would need to be changed. The meetings run pretty smoothly.

Residents of the 2B-07 single member district can cast their ballots next month at the Brookings Institution on Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m.

Click here for more information regarding voter eligibility and the voting process.

This interview was edited for length and clarity

by Tim Regan — September 22, 2015 at 1:20 pm 213 0

Brianne_NadeauWatch out, frequently absent ANC commissioners.

D.C. Councilmember Brianne Nadeau today introduced a bill that would ax commissioners who miss meetings for three months in a row.

The bill, called the Advisory Neighborhood Commission Absenteeism Penalty Amendment Act of 2015, was co-introduced by councilmembers Anita Bonds and Elissa Silverman and aims to “make it easier for ANCs to reliably have the quorum required to conduct official business.”

“Like several of my colleagues, I was an ANC Commissioner,” said Nadeau, who served on ANC 1B from 2006 to 2010, from the podium. “I found, as many commissioners can relate to, it can be difficult to enforce attendance among a group of volunteer leaders.”

As written in the bill, any commissioner who fails to attend official public meetings for three months will “be considered resigned from the position.”

“District residents and business leaders should not be penalized for poor attendance of their representatives,” Nadeau added from the dais.

Nadeau said that the legislation was requested in a resolution from Columbia Heights and Park View ANC 1A, and that it “mirrors similar language already in the procedures governing ANC 1B.”

Photo courtesy of Brianne Nadeau

by Tim Regan — September 16, 2015 at 1:30 pm 0

John Kupcinski at anc2b meeting

Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B is getting ready for a special election.

Residents Holly Biglow and John Kupcinski have entered into a race for former commissioner Justine Underhill’s 2B-07 seat, which was vacated last month when Underhill moved to New York City. Now, here’s your chance to hear from one of them.

We spoke with Kupcinski about some of the local issues he feels strongly about:

Borderstan: Tell me a little bit about why you decided to run for the 2B-07 seat.

John Kupcinski: I’ve been involved in neighborhood politics, I purchased my property about a year and a half ago or so. I made a fairly big investment. It’s the biggest purchase I’ll probably ever make in my entire life So I wanted to make a big investment in the community as well. I got involved with Church Street Neighbors. Meeting the people who are my neighbors, I’m a proponent of trying to make things better. I felt like this is one of the ways I could contribute to the community.

If you are elected, what will be one of your first priorities?

First and foremost, … I’d like to try to [figure out] how the construction is going to happen [at the St. Thomas’ Parish], how the operations will work, how the pre-construction, construction will work. Just make sure there aren’t any misunderstandings. It’s going to be one of the biggest developments happening in 2B-07.

How do you plan to interact with other neighborhood associations, if elected?

It’s important to have people’s voices heard. One of the things we’re blessed with in 2B-07 is that we have a lot of very active and engaged community members who have decided to participate in the political process. So that, I think, is a fantastic benefit and also something that can help whoever the ANC commissioner is in October. I would see those organizations as a conduit for ideas and to help out with initiatives and to be able to provide communication back and forth between constituent groups within the neighborhood.

Is there anything you’d want to change in the way ANC 2B operates?

This is kind of a non-answer, but my perception has been on the other side of the microphone. So, I would need to get in and see the workings of how things are happening. I don’t know yet. But I am looking forward to working with everybody. I think that everybody in the ANC has a significant amount to give and contribute. They’ve made the neighborhood a better place to live in. I’m excited about working with everybody.

You said previously that, even if you don’t win the election, you’ll still be involved in the community. Are there specific things you’d undertake?

I’ve been very fortunate to, through this process, to meet a number of the different neighbors and develop a lot of close friendships. I would get involved in [Dupont Circle Citizens Association] or Church Street Neighbors or even work with a message board that people are active on within the community.

How will you use social media to engage with your potential future constituents?

My Twitter is very professional. Mostly articles that I think are interesting with respect to information security. One of the things that I would like to do is find a way to engage people on social media, whether that be on Twitter, create a 2B-07 media account. Using other blogs. I know the ANC has a blog. But I’d try to find as many ways to reach out to people.

Residents of the 2B-07 single member district can cast their ballots next month at the Brookings Institution on Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m.

Click here for more information regarding voter eligibility and the voting process.

by Tim Regan — September 10, 2015 at 10:30 am 0

Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B is getting ready for a special election.

Residents Holly Biglow and John Kupcinski have entered into a race for former commissioner Justine Underhill’s 2B-07 seat, which was vacated last month when Underhill moved to New York City.

The two candidates introduced themselves and touched upon community issues during “stump speeches” at last night’s ANC 2B meeting at the Brookings Institution (1775 Massachusetts Avenue NW) near Dupont Circle.

Holly Biglow, who said she’s lived in P Street NW for six years, touched upon the hotly debated issue of the St. Thomas Church development project.

“I am aware of the St. Thomas Church development project, which I know has been a major issue. I’m also aware that a neighborhood group has developed work on some of the issues they have regarding this project,” Biglow said. “I definitely commend them on all the work that they’ve done and all the things that they’ve accomplished.”

“I really look forward to working with the group if possible to continue to address the neighbor’s needs,” she added.

“This neighborhood has various issues that need to be addressed,” Biglow concluded. “I’m a very open-minded person. I really look forward to working on a vast number of issues that ANC 2B-07 and the rest of the ANC will be working on.”

Kupcinski, who owns a consulting firm in the area, then stepped in front of the microphone to introduce himself.

“I’ve been involved in the community ever since I purchased [my home] about a year and a half ago,” said Kupcinski. “I got involved in the Church Street neighbors. I got to meet lots of our wonderful neighbors and our ANC.”

“I’ve been to a lot of ANC meetings,” he added. “I’m excited about Dupont, both what it was and what it’s growing into be. I think that we’re at a very interesting point in terms of the changing dynamics and shifts as other parts of the city continue to develop.”

“Regardless of the outcome of the election, I’m still going to be involved,” he said. “You’ll still see my face on a monthly basis. You’ll still see me walking my dog around the neighborhood.”

Newly revived ANC blog Short Articles About Long Meetings recorded both speeches and uploaded them to Youtube earlier this morning.

Residents of the 2B-07 single member district can cast their ballots next month at the Brookings Institution on Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m.

Click here for more information regarding voter eligibility and the voting process.

by Tim Regan — September 4, 2015 at 1:00 pm 404 0

LaKisha Brown

ANC 1B has a new commissioner.

The commission welcomed LaKisha Brown, 1B-04, to her new seat with a round of applause during a general meeting at Howard University’s Founders Library last night.

Brown, who quietly participated in the meeting, said she’s excited to learn the ropes and start participating in the process. “It’s a lot of information to take in, but I think I’ll learn a lot more about it. I’m interested in a lot of these issues,” she said.

“I’ve always had a passion for helping my community, so I think this is something that will help fulfill that passion,” she explained.

Brown added she hopes to take up issues of parking, affordable housing, zoning and noise complaints in the future.

Above all else, Brown says she wants to act as a representative for her neighbors to voice concerns.

“It’s great interacting with people and learning about [their issues],” she said. “At least I’m another voice.”

by Tim Regan — August 17, 2015 at 2:35 pm 273 0

David Garber, photo courtesy of David Garber

David Garber has a strategy: Hit incumbent at-large D.C. Councilmember Vincent Orange where he’s vulnerable. In a campaign announcement video, Garber grabbed the attention of some voters by scolding Orange’s ethics. “We simply deserve better,” Garber said. But Garber acknowledges it takes more than shaming an incumbent to win an election.

Borderstan spoke with the challenger and former Navy Yard ANC commissioner about his upcoming campaign:

Borderstan: Tell me why you’re running for Vincent Orange’s at-large D.C. Councilmember seat.

David Garber: I’m running for this seat because I want to be the advocate for communities across the District. What that’s meant for me in the past, both as an engaged citizen and as a two-term elected ANC Commissioner, has been a lot about learning the value of listening to residents as anything is happening within neighborhoods and District-wide. Making sure that, in the way the city grows and in the decisions that are being made and what’s being prioritized across the District, we’re taking a lot of our feedback from the people in these actual communities.

What will be your first priority or new initiative, and why?

The three top issues for me right now are education, public safety, and housing. I’ve had a fair amount of experience within the education sphere, whether as a substitute teacher or advocating for a new public elementary school in the neighborhood where I was ANC commissioner. That school is opening this fall.

With regards to the growth of the city, I’ve lived in three very different neighborhoods in my time in the District. I’ve lived in Anacostia, east of the river, I’ve lived in Navy Yard and I’ve lived in the Logan Circle/Shaw neighborhood. I feel like those are all pretty distinct, and have given me a pretty unique perspective for understanding how certain parts of the city have been overlooked and haven’t been served well in the past and wanting to make sure that, as we go forward, we’re being equitable about our development and our investments across the city.

Which parts of the city do you think have been overlooked?

A lot of people, especially east of the river, are concerned that real investment hasn’t been made in a lot of those communities over the years in the way that it has been other places. As a resident there, myself, what I was seeing at the time was that it was coming down to the decisions of political leadership. That was my first crash course in realizing that, if I want to see something change with regards to how the communities were being prioritized I needed to get involved, myself.

But you could point to other communities. Kennedy Street NW in Ward 4. Places in Ward 5. Fortunately, we’re in a time where there is a lot of investment in D.C. and different areas are being brought up in different ways. Hopefully we’re doing that while taking care of all of the existing residents that are in these communities. But I do think that more could still be done.

What did you learn from your time as an ANC commissioner in Navy Yard that you could apply to serving on the D.C. Council?

One of my first lessons was in the absolute importance of listening to residents at every step of the way, both in my decision making and with regard to any issues that were coming through the neighborhood.

I started a citizens’ development advisory committee, for example, that was able to speak into a lot of development that was happening in the Navy Yard ballpark area, and I made sure that I was reaching out to the community both online and in-person on issues there were really important. A lot of these issues did relate to development.

Navy Yard is a neighborhood where a lot of the people there were really excited about a lot of the changes that were happening. … But they wanted to make sure it was done in a right way and in a way that we’re really proud of 10 years from now and 20 years from now.

The other lesson I learned was just about the importance of working with my colleagues to make our work on the ANC as effective as possible. I think it’s easy to come into an elected position feeling very black-and-white on issues and not wanting to work with others who might disagree with you. One of the things that I enjoyed the most during my time on the ANC was working with people who we might not have lined up 100 percent on issues, but we had to work together and we had to find a common solution. As a councilmember, it’s important to be effective.

As you know, crime is a big topic in D.C. right now. Last night, you went on a ride-along with police. What did you learn?

My biggest priority right now is making sure that I’m doing everything I can to learn about what possible changes need to be made or what actions can be taken right now to improve the safety situation around the District.

I live in Shaw, and me and my neighbors feel like there’s a lot of violent crimes taking place almost daily. There has been an uptick in violent crime, it absolutely feels like there has been. I know people are looking to leadership right now to both make changes, whether it’s within the policies of the Metropolitan Police Department or how they’re doing their beats around the District. I’m trying to both listen to as many neighbors as possible, listen to police officers, try to get a sense for what’s working and what’s not working, so that we can move forward in a way that everybody feels safe in their communities, regardless of where they are.

Based on what you saw last night, is there anything that you’d want to change?

One thing that kept coming up was the need for more police officers in the District. There was a hiring boom in the ’80s and ’90s that is now turning into a retirement boom. Unfortunately, the new hires and police academy graduates aren’t catching up to the people leaving the force.

We need to make sure that we are providing the best place for these police officers to be when they’re choosing where to work. Whether that is offering incentives for living within the District or what have you, I think there are absolutely ways to making this a city where officers want to live because they feel supported and they’re able to get their work done.

Orange is the incumbent, so he most likely has an advantage. How do you feel about the upcoming race?

I feel really great about this upcoming race. I’ve felt really humbled over the last couple of weeks by the incredible amount of support that I’ve felt from people around the District, both in the encouragement and in their financial support, which at the end of the day, is going to mean a great deal in this election.

I’ve got an awesome team behind me. … I’m excited to start some of the more visible elements of my campaign, like door-knocking, meet-and-greets and introducing myself to voters and listening to issues that they care about.

This interview has been edited slightly for clarity and length

Image courtesy of David Garber

by Tim Regan — August 14, 2015 at 4:40 pm 136 0


ANC 1B needs another new commissioner.

The latest position opened when former commissioner Allyson Carpenter, 1B-10, said she planned to resign from the position because she is moving. The D.C. Board of Elections published the position opening on its website today.

The neighborhood commission last sought a new commissioner in June and July with the departure of Mitchel Herckis, 1B-04.

Want to be an ANC commissioner? To qualify for the election, candidates must live in 1B-10, which sits at the northeast corner of the ANC’s boundary.

Potential candidates must also solicit signatures from local residents.

If no one applies for candidacy, the D.C. Board of Elections will continue to declare the vacancy until a candidate steps forward.

Locals can pick up nominating petitions at the D.C. Board of Elections office located at 441 4th Street NW.

Image via Facebook.com/ANC1B

by Tim Regan — July 21, 2015 at 11:30 am 0

Brianne Nadeau, photo via Facebook.com/BrianneKNadeau(Updated at 10:30 a.m. on Friday, July 24) Ward 1 residents will have another chance to meet and talk with D.C. Councilmember Brianne Nadeau next week.

Nadeau will visit the Thurgood Marshall Center (1816 12th St NW) next Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. to chat with locals one-on-one, take questions and meet those interested in just saying hello.

At-large D.C. Councilmember Elissa Silverman will also be in attendance.

The event is part of Nadeau’s Brianne on Your Block series, a regular series of public appearances connecting Nadeau with Ward 1 residents in informal settings.

Photo via Facebook.com/BrianneKNadeau

by Tim Regan — July 20, 2015 at 4:30 pm 0

-06.01-DuPont-webres-39Some Dupont Circle residents will soon have the chance to dive into local politics.

ANC 2B formally announced yesterday that it needs a new commissioner for its 2B07 seat.

“Earlier this month Commissioner Justine Underhill announced her resignation from the Dupont Circle ANC to pursue a career opportunity outside of Washington,” reads the announcement. “On July 17, the Board of Elections certified a vacancy for single member district 2B07 and today we are seeking a committed and enthusiastic resident of 2B07 to fill that position.”

“Commissioner Underhill has been invaluable in bringing the neighborhood together around issues big and small, including the ongoing development process of the St. Thomas Church property at 1772 Church [Street NW],” continues the announcement.

To qualify for the election, candidates must live in 2B07, a small area immediately east and southeast of Dupont Circle.

Potential candidates must also collect 25 signatures of registered voters who live in 2B07 by Aug. 10.

A special election will be held in September or October if two or more candidates successfully file petitions.

If there is only one candidate, that person will be certified as the 2B07 commissioner.

If there are no candidates, the D.C. Board of Elections will continue to declare the vacancy until a candidate steps forward.

Locals can pick up nominating petitions at the D.C. Board of Elections office, which is located at 441 4th Street NW.

by Jared Holt — July 20, 2015 at 1:30 pm 182 0

A throng of people gathered earlier this morning and cheered in celebration at the sight of the Cuban flag waving in front of the country’s newly reopened embassy at 2630 16th Street NW

Diplomats lined the front wall of the embassy and cheered as decorated guards raised the red, blue and white banner.

Like most political ceremonies, the event included some protestors, too.

One man stepped out of his brown leather shoes, peeled off the top layer of his shirt and sprinted across the busy street. He then hopped a row of sidewalk barricades, ran toward the embassy gate and covered himself in fake blood. Officials detained the protestor at the gate.

Others held up banners and chanted anti-Cuba slogans.

Despite the jeers, most locals attending the ceremony seemed to welcome their new neighbors.

Alejandro Sánchez Nieto, who works a few blocks away, said he thinks the embassy will bring new people to Meridian Hill.

“You’ll have more people coming to the embassy for visas, which means they’re going to know the area and the other embassies around here,” Nieto said.

“Now that the embassy is restored to full potential, hopefully in 2016 during Embassy Day you will have the Cuban Embassy open to the public, which would be a big opportunity for people to visit this community,” added Nieto.

by Jared Holt — July 15, 2015 at 5:00 pm 189 0

ANC 1B04

ANC 1B needs a new commissioner.

The position opened when former commissioner Mitchel Herckis resigned on June 11, ANC 1B-11 commissioner Robb Hudson said.

Last month, the ANC board published the position opening with the D.C. Board of Elections in hopes of finding a candidate.

“It would be unfortunate for 1B-04 to go unrepresented any longer,” said Hudson in an e-mail to Borderstan. “Those residents need a voice on the Commission that represents their needs and interests specifically.”

To qualify for the election, candidates must live in 1B04, a small area of city that includes slices of 12th to 15th streets NW, Florida Avenue NW, and W Street NW.

Potential candidates must also solicit signatures from local residents.

If no one applies for candidacy, the D.C. Board of Elections will continue to declare the vacancy until a candidate steps forward.

Locals can pick up nominating petitions at the D.C. Board of Elections office located at 441 4th Street NW.

Graphic created with image via Facebook.com/ANC1B

by Borderstan.com — June 27, 2013 at 10:00 am 7 Comments

From David McAuley. Email him at david[AT]borderstan.com.


The Men’s Parties club was on the second floor of 1618 14th Street NW. (Luis Gomez Photos)

Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2F/Logan may vote to oppose the demolition of 1618 14th Street NW, former site of the sex club, “Men Parties.”

At last night’s meeting, ANC 2F’s Community Development Committee (CDC) voted 6-0 to recommend the full ANC not support an application to DC’s Historical Preservation Review Board (HPRB) for a raze permit for the building. The demolition requires permission from the HPRB because the building is within the boundaries of the Fourteenth Street Historic District.

There was a death at the club in 2009 which led DC to file suit to close the club.

Jeff Owens appeared before the committee to plead the case of the building’s owner, Stephen Jaffe. Reports indicate Jaffe has been the owner since before the 2009 incident.

Owens said the building had been gutted and is now exposed to the elements. He also said the building’s perimeter wall is buckling and the floor joists are gone. Neighborhood residents testified the building is neglected and some windows are open permanently.

Owens also said there is a tentative plan for a new building on the site which would have retail on the first floor and apartments above.

Neighborhood residents testified the building has been an eyesore for years and there were many unsuccessful attempts by neighbors to do something about it. One neighbor brought up the owner’s responsibility for the club and the 2009 death.

“He [Jaffe] knows nothing about that,” Owens said.

Members of the committee came out strongly in favor of preserving the building.

“This is the type of case that historic preservation laws have been designed to protect,” said one committee member.

“This is an absolute case of demolition by neglect,” said another.

“It’s a contributing building,” said committee chair Walt Cain, ANC commissioner for district 02.

The matter may be next considered at the regular monthly meeting of ANC 2F. This is scheduled for Wednesday, July 10, at 7 pm, at the Washington Plaza Hotel, 10 Thomas Circle NW.

A notice that an application to raze the building had been filed first appeared at the property in April of this year.

by Borderstan.com — June 25, 2013 at 8:00 am 0

From David McAuley. Email him at david[AT]borderstan.com.

At its second listening session on the East Dupont liquor license moratorium last night, Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2B/Dupont released a list of moratorium-related questions and asked concerned residents to submit their comments electronically on all or some of them. The group email address for the commissioners is: 17thStCommissioners [at] dupontcircleanc dot net.


Map of Dupont East Moratorium Zone from ANC2B (Courtesy ANC 2B)

The Dupont East liquor license moratorium is often called the 17th Street Moratorium.

The Questions

  1. How has the 17th Street moratorium positively or negatively impacted your vision for the neighborhood?
  2. Do you have concerns about licensed establishments in the neighborhood and do you think a moratorium appropriately and effectively addresses them?
  3. What is the single primary concern in the neighborhood that a moratorium is currently addressing?
  4. If restrictions on the number of restaurant licenses were lifted, do you think the ANC should implement a policy attempting to limit the operations of new restaurants, including hours of operation?
  5. What are your specific expectations/desires if the moratorium expires?
  6. How do you suggest the ANC vote in this matter?
  7. If you favor letting the moratorium expire, are there any restrictions that you would want the ANC to attempt to achieve by other means, e.g., size, outdoor service hours, indoor service hours, security plan? Any restrictions that would be specific to particular addresses?
  8. If you favor extending the moratorium as it is, what specific concerns do you have about what would happen in the absence of a moratorium?
  9. If you have lived near 17th Street or have visited 17th Street for a long time, describe how things have changed since the moratorium went into effect in 1990. Describe specific situations that have been improved or not allowed to increase as the result of the moratorium.
  10. If you are willing to see additional restaurants or no restrictions on the number of restaurants, are there any restrictions that you would want the ANC to attempt to achieve by other means, e.g., size, outdoor service hours, indoor service hours, security plan? Any restrictions that would be specific to particular addresses?
  11. Identify vacant retail spaces in the East Dupont Moratorium Zone (see map) and describe what sort of occupant you would like to see and your ideas about how residents could assist the realization of your vision?

Monday-Night Meeting

The listening session was sparsely attended. Many seats were empty. I heard four people who were not familiar faces from previous meetings on various liquor license moratoriums express their opinions. Of these, one declared himself for preserving the moratorium as is. He identified himself as a long-term resident of the area, a profession economist, and a former ANC Commissioner.

“Passing laws and changing policies is not always the answer,” he said.

Two newer residents, both women, said they wished to see the moratorium scrapped entirely.

One man remarked on the longevity of the 23-year-old moratorium. “We need to hang it up if we haven’t thought of alternatives by now,” he said.

Fred Moosally, Director of DC’s Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration (ABRA), gave a short talk on liquor license moratoriums at the beginning of the meeting.

About the timing of ANC 2B’s decision, Moosally said, “The sooner we get something, the better.”

If no action is taken, the moratorium will expire on September 23.

“The Board won’t decide to extend [the moratorium] without a request,” Moosally said. This means ANC 2B would have to get any request to ABRA quickly after its regular monthly meeting in August, when it plans to address the matter.

Community groups may also file independent requests to extend the moratorium.

At the May listening session, there was talk of scrapping the East Dupont moratorium for restaurant licenses only. As a result, at this session, there was a discussion of how to prevent restaurant licensees from turning their establishments into de facto nightclubs or taverns. Moosally said ABRA was the enforcer for violations of license terms, and could issues citations and fines. ABRA will also send investigators into restaurant licensees to check if food is really available, if they receive complaints.

However, Moosally admitted it is often a lengthly and time-consuming process to prove restaurant licensees are not operating according to the terms of their license. Restaurant licensees cannot have more than 45% of their total revenues from alcohol sales, but ABRA requires four full quarters of data to take action.

The Metropolitan Police Department did not respond to an invitation to address the meeting.

ANC 2B Commissioners in attendance were: Kevin O’Connor, 2B-02, Stephanie Maltz, 2B-03, Kishan Putta, 2B-04, Abigail Nichols, 2B-05, Leo Dwyer, 2B-07, and Noah Smith, 2B-09.

by Borderstan.com — June 24, 2013 at 9:00 am 0

From David McAuley. Email him at david[AT]borderstan.com.


Map of Dupont East Moratorium Zone. (Courtesy ANC 2B)

The liquor licensing (ABRA Policy) committee of Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2B/Dupont will hold a meeting tonight, June 24. Time is 7 pm in the ground-floor ballroom of the Chastleton Cooperative (1701 16th Street NW).

The meeting will be the second of three listening sessions on the possible extension of the East Dupont Circle Moratorium Zone, also known as the 17th Street Moratorium. The ANC asks that members of the public come and let ANC commissioners know their opinion on the moratorium, which is set to expire September 23.

Representatives of the Metropolitan Police Department and DC’s Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration (ABRA) have also been invited to attend the meeting.

According to a new blog post on ANC2B’s website, the moratorium was put in place in 1990. It was renewed in 1995, 2000, 2005 and 2010. It currently limits the liquor-selling establishments in the zone to two liquor stories, two grocery stores, 16 restaurants, and two taverns. No nightclub licenses are permitted in the moratorium zone.

There are currently five liquor license moratoriums in DC, including East Dupont Circle. No liquor license moratorium, once in effect, has ever been completely repealed.

After consulting community opinion, the ANC may make a recommendation to DC’s Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board on this matter. The ANC may recommend continuing the moratorium or modifying it. Under law, the ABC Board must give ANC opinions “great weight,” but it is not obligated to agree with ANC opinion.

ABC Board decisions on liquor license moratoriums are normally approved by the DC Council and signed into law without modification.

At a meeting of ANC 2B’s liquor licensing affairs committee meeting on June 19, ANC 2B Committee Chair Kevin O’Connor said, based on his observation of the ANC Board’s reaction to the recent debate on the proposed U Street liquor license moratorium, the Board would be unlikely to agree with a resolution to continue the moratorium without modification.

“An ‘as is’ moratorium would be dead on arrival,” he said.

If the ANC decides to let the moratorium expire, it may simply choose to take no action. However, community groups may independently petition the ABC Board for an extension of the moratorium.

At the previous listening session on May 22, opinion was divided on the moratorium, with nearly equal numbers of speakers for and against. A compromise solution to lift the moratorium on new restaurant liquor licenses only was discussed.

If you can’t make the meeting, the ANC is also encouraging people to send their comments by email to 17thStCommissioners [at] dupontcircleanc dot net.

There will be a final listening session on Wednesday, August 7. It is planned that the committee’s draft proposal will be made public at this meeting. After further public comment, the full ANC will then consider the proposal at its regular monthly meeting the following week, Wednesday, August 14.


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