by Borderstan.com June 21, 2013 at 8:44 am 0

"berries"

Cherries and Berries at 14th & U Framers Market (Luis Gomez Photos)

This Saturday the 14 & U Farmers Market is a cherries and berries market. From 9 am to 1 pm enjoy strolling through the market, picking up sweet cherries, raspberries, red currants, blueberries and a few blackberries are all around. Here some recipes for you.

Market Highlights

  • Do stop by Itbi at 10 am for a cooking demo with two summer salads: Kale and mixed root vegetable slaw.
  • Panorama is bringing as always their delicious croissants, bear claws and pretzels, and a great selection of pastries and baked goods.
  • Cherry Glen Goat Cheese’s  Bryan will have a sampling of the best French style goat cheese you will find. Fresh chevre only a day old, ricotta, and five different kinds of soft, wedge shaped Monocacies.
  • Mountain View has carrots, squash, kale, radishes, beets and cut herbs.
  • Truck Patch is bringing turkey and turkey breast this week.

Come early for your full selection of your favorites vendors at the market. Market hours are 9 am to 1 pm, Saturdays only.

So there you have it. Enjoy the market and try to keep cool during this weekend.

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by Borderstan.com June 10, 2013 at 12:00 pm 0

From Aparna Krishnamoorthy. Email her at aparna[AT]borderstan.com. Follow her on Twitter @aparnakris.

"Squash"

Squash Blossoms are ready this summer. (Aparna Krishnamoorthy.

The arrival of summer squashes brings with them their delicate, edible flowers typically found at area farmers’ markets and specialty stores — we are lucky to have such great farmers’ markets in the area.

This past weekend, I spotted zucchini blossoms at the 14 and U Farmers Market, and immediately picked up some. I also learned that all squashes produce flowers, but typically it’s the zucchini flowers that are popular as edible treats.

Squash blossoms are best eaten the day you buy them.  While there are many ways to enjoy them, the blossoms are such a rare and seasonal treat that I serve them simply fried.

Squash Blossoms

Ingredients

  • Oil, flour, milk, salt, pepper. And the blossoms.

Directions

  1. Whisk up a couple of spoonful’s of flour with a splash of milk, keeping the batter light and thin. (A thick batter will overwhelm the delicate flowers)
  2. Add in a pinch of salt and pepper.
  3. Heat the oil in a non-stick pan to cover the base (a couple of millimeters will do)
  4. When the oil is hot, take a blossom, dredge it in the batter using a swirling motion and slide it into the hot oil.
  5. Turn it a couple of times, until it’s is golden and crisp all over.
  6. Drain on a paper towel; add pepper and a bit more salt.
  7. Enjoy after cooling very slightly.

Simple and delicious.

If you are averse to frying, stuff the blossoms with cheese (ricotta or goat works great) and bake them in the oven.

Whatever you do with them, and look here for ideas, don’t let them scare you. These treats are not often seen in restaurant menus, so grab them when you see them. It’s one of the best summer foods.

Any other ideas for squash blossoms? Share them in the comments!

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by Borderstan.com May 31, 2013 at 4:00 pm 0

"Market"

The 14th & U Farmer’s Market. (Luis Gomez Photos)

Summer is here and the temperatures have risen. Make sure you wear a hat and some skin protection as you head out this Saturday to the 14 & U Farmers Market. We are told that the list of summer produce is extensive:

  • Sugar Snap Peas, Sweet Garden Peas, just dug baby Yukon Gold potatoes, Leeks, baby zucchini with their flowers, sweet Candy Onions, Spring Onions, Green Garlic and Shallot scopes, Spinach, Broccoli rabe, Green Kale, Toscano Kale, Redbore Kale, Baby Beets, Turnips, Sweet Hakurei Salad Turnips,
  • The Northern Neck strawberries are slowing down but the Pennsylvania berries are taking their place — look for Sweet Charlies, Earliglows, Ovations and Chandlers. Asparagus too.And don’t forget the rhubarb
  • Strawberry rhubarb, chocolate pecan pies, chard with roasted garlic and goat cheese quiche are at Whisked. Panorama has a double-decker table of Damien’s Breton and Parisian pastries and breads.
  • Peonies, poppies, hanging baskets, hundreds of potted herbs and vegetables and summer flowers.
  • Grillers: tons of steak at Pecan Meadow and lots of cuts of pork like Porterhouse and the Porcine version of New York Strip. (Ask Truck Patch). Sausages at both. Lamb, goat, rabbit, duck, Eggs from chickens, ducks and geese.

Market hours are 9 am to 1 pm, Saturdays only.

So there you have it. Enjoy the market and try to keep cool during this weekend.

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by Borderstan.com May 17, 2013 at 11:30 am 0

"Strawberries"

Strawberries are coming and Alejandra has recipes galore. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Alejandra Owens. You can find her at her food blog, One Bite At A Time. Alejandra also writes for City Eats DC, a Food Network site, where you can book dinner reservations. Follow her on Twitter at @frijolita and email her at alejandra[AT]borderstan.com

Last year, the most awful thing happened to me. I was at the grocery store, just weeks after the local strawberry season had ended and I was lamenting the lack of those little red jewels in my life. I was sad. I missed them!

So I bought a pint of the little buggers from The Teet.

Wow, was that a mistake. They were watery, tasteless and mealy. I mean, I didn’t really even understand what mealy felt like in my mouth until that moment. What the heck!? I had been eating grocery store strawberries my whole life (with the rare exception of cartons bought on the side of the road from Mexicans, who crossed the boarder to set up mini market stands — I grew up about 40 minutes from the U.S.-Mexico border) and in that moment, I felt screwed. Had they always tasted like that? Had I elevated myself to the next level of strawberry consciousness with my farmers market shopping ways?

I’m hoping I just landed a bad batch, ’cause as much as I try to shop local and seasonal, there are just moments, there are desserts, that call for strawberries when they’re not in season in like, you know,Pennsylvania!!!

This week’s FreshFarm Markets‘ newsletter mentioned that they would have strawberries from Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania this Saturday and I got tres excited. We can throw a strawberry party now, just so we’re ready.

Here are some strawberry recipes to get you started:

What’s on your market list for this weekend? Don’t forget, if you have questions about the market, just tweet me!

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by Borderstan.com May 4, 2013 at 8:00 am 1,216 0

"market"

The 14th & U Farmer’s Market. (Luis Gomez Photos)

The 14th and U Farmers Market will be open this Saturday at the corner of 14th and U Streets at the Reeves Center from 9 am to 1 pm. These are the hours throughout the season (Saturdays only).

It is a great weekend for strawberries and asparagus.  Pleasant Pops has joined the market and will be inaugurating their first visit with Strawberry Ginger Lemonade, Strawberries & Cream, Honey Lavender and Mexican Sweet Cream and Cinnamon pops.

Whisked will be there as well with its great pastries.  Plenty of pastured pork and grass fed beef and lamb, duck and rabbit.  Real French style goat cheeses and delicious breads to go with from Panomamas’s.

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by Borderstan.com March 29, 2013 at 11:00 am 0

Looking for advice on how to accomplish your goals and make changes in 2013? Email Chelsea at askchelsea[AT]borderstan.com.

"Farmers"

The 14 & U Farmer’s Market is open spring through fall. (Luis Gomez Photos)

Spring, finally upon us, means the opening of many farmers markets in the area–a great pit stop after work or destination for a Sunday morning stroll (or date!). The sun is shining, flowers are blooming and the summer harvest is just around the corner.

Farmers markets connect consumers to the food they eat and the people that grow it. They also bring neighbors together to admire and appreciate fresh produce and homemade products. Hint: It’s also the best spot in town for people-watching.

The few that seem to forget these romantic sentiments can really bring down the whole communal vibe. While tolerance is key for any sales position, acting like a conscientious customer helps everyone else enjoy themselves more, too.  Here are some etiquette tips that go a long way with farmers, patrons and salespeople alike!

Tips for the Market

  • DO try out the samples. That’s what they are there for. Ask questions–tell your salesperson flavors you like and they will probably let you try before you buy.
  • DON’T sample the entire table as you pass by and then walk away. You can’t hide. Farmers are not in the business of making money and every apple used for samples is one less apple sold for profit.
  • DO save change during the week and use your coins! Exact change makes the math easier and gets you out of the checkout line quicker.
  • DON’T use a $100 bill for a purchase under $10. The cash register is not an ATM machine. Singles and tens can be hard to come by, so try to break your twenties before coming to the market if you can.
  • DO bring your own bags. Reusable (cloth) bags cut down on the cost of plastic on our environment as well as costs to farmers who make and purchase bags. If you need a plastic bag, reuse it for bagging your produce the following weeks or to line a waste bin at home.
  • DON’T hold up the line by talking on your cell phone during checkout–interact with the person behind the counter! Be considerate of those behind you–hang up the phone and organize your bags, money, tissues, receipts, change, gum wrappers, trash, etc. before you get in line.

The Dupont Freshfarm Market‘s spring hours begin Sunday, April 7: 8:30 am to 1 pm. The Penn Quarter Farmers Market runs every Thursday from 3 to 7 pm. Mt. Pleasant Farmers Market opens April 6 and the 14 and U Farmers’ Market opens May 5 (Saturdays from 9 am to 1 pm).

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by Borderstan.com February 1, 2013 at 10:00 am 0

From David McAuley. Email him at david[AT]borderstan.com

"Kuhn"

Kuhn Orchards delivering your order. (Luis Gomez Photos)

Community Supported Agriculture in Borderstan: The View from Mid-winter

Kuhn Orchards supplies Borderstan with fresh fruit and vegetables throughout the winter via its Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program. At an ungodly early hour every other Saturday, the Kuhn Orchard trucks brave the winter dark from their home base in Cashtown, Pennsylvania, to deliver cases of locally-grown produce in the parking lot of St. Augustine’s Catholic Church at 14th and V Streets NW.

Kuhn is familiar to many Borderstanis as a fixture at the western end of the summer U Street farmer’s market. However, during their winter deliveries, Kuhn won’t take your money. Following standard CSA practice, you have to pay the entire cost of all the winter’s deliveries (this year $385) up front. There are 11 deliveries between December and April. Kuhn tries to work with customers, but when you sign up for the CSA it is basically understood that, most of the time, you will take what the CSA offers. CSA membership is not for wimpy eaters.

The unusual items are the best part of CSA membership. They push the casual home cook out of the rut of long-used recipes. In December, a CSA delivery included sunchokes, otherwise known as Jerusalem artichokes, a root vegetable that looks like ginger and tastes like a cross between a potato and a water chestnut. Since Kuhn Orchards wants you to take their less-well-known items enthusiastically, joining members get an information pamphlet with idiot-proof recipes featuring these items like, in this case, Cream of Sunchoke Soup. It was delicious and a great conversation piece with the dinner guests.

Familiar or not, CSA produce is a great remedy for the mid-winter food blahs. It is literally straight from the farm. The fresh and vibrant tastes are like a little slice of summer and puts supermarket produce to shame. It’s too late to join the CSA in the heart of Borderstan this year, but we’ll post information this autumn about local winter CSA membership when it comes available.

For more information about Kuhn Orchards and their CSA program is available at their blog here.

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by Borderstan.com November 9, 2012 at 12:00 pm 1,025 0

"market"

14th & U Farmers Market. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

The warm weather is weaning and so is the summer and early fall’s bountiful harvest. This Saturday, November 10, is the next-to-last week of the 14 and U Farmers’ Market.

Stop by the market this weekend to checkout its seasonal variety of squashes, sweet potatoes, apples, pears, Brussels sprouts and more. Whether you are gathering some inspiration for your Thanksgiving Day spread, or just simply picking up your produce (and baked goods) for the week, the 14th and U Farmers Market has what you are looking for.

And if you need some food inspiration, be sure to browse the market’s Facebook page — it has lots of yummy recipes for fresh and seasonal dishes.

The market will be open from 9 am until 1 pm. If you’re still looking for a market to visit this winter, the Dupont Farmers Market is open Sundays 8:30 am to 1 pm April through December, and Sundays 10 am to 1 pm January through March.

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by Borderstan.com August 31, 2012 at 12:00 pm 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

"Farmers Market"

The 14 & U Farmers’ Market is open Saturdays from 9 am to 1 pm. (Luis Gomez Photos)

If you’re grilling out or picnicking this last weekend of summer, chances are, the farmers market at 14th and U Streets NW has just what you need for your menu. The market is open on Saturdays from 9 am to 1 pm.

Weekend Finds

  • Truck Patch has barbecued ribs, chops, shoulder and sausages; Pecan Meadow has grass fed and finished beef brigade, as well as goat, duck and rabbit.
  • For fruit, expect peaches, nectarines, plums, pears, strawberries, blackberries and grapes and figs. And what’s a summer cookout without a watermelon? There are plenty of those to go around, too.
  • Whisked is ready with six-and-nine-inch pies, savory and sweet.
  • For the veggie lovers, carts are overflowing with mushrooms, heirloom tomatoes, squash, zucchini and eggplant.

And for those who need a little inspiration or entertainment, Chef Harper McClure of the Federalist will conduct a cooking demo at 11 am. The market is open on Saturday, September 1 from 9 am until 1 pm. For more information, visit the Facebook page.

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by Borderstan.com August 3, 2012 at 2:00 pm 1,437 0

"Market"

The 14 & U Farmers’ Market joins MidCity Dog Days Celebration. (Luis Gomez Photos)

This weekend is all about MidCity Dogs Days. This Saturday the 14 & U Farmers’ Market joins the celebration with live entertainment, sales, free shopping bags (courtesy of Room & Board) and fans. (You can also get more info on the market’s Facebook page.) The market is open Saturdays from 9 am to 1 pm.

What to Expect?

Just like every Saturday, your favorite stands will be there with fresh produce, meats, baked goods and flowers.

  • There will be a cooking demonstration by Ibti Vincent and Think Local First DC — with great market recipes.
  • Whisked! will have a Pie Raffle with a Mixed Berry Pie, and Corn and Feta Quiche.
  • Dolcezza is having a big sale on all the flavors of their gelati and sorbeti.
  • Panorama will offer French breakfast pastries on sale.
  • Goat Cheese? Cherry Glen’s Goat Cheese is real French style Chevre… plus Ricotta and artisanal mounds of matured brie-like cheese soft rind cheeses
  • It’s tomato season (and there’s no better plan to get heirlooms.) Check out Truck Patch.
  • And don’t forget the meat. There is always a great selection of pork and beef from several vendors, straight from local farms.

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by Borderstan.com July 6, 2012 at 10:00 am 1,347 0

"Corn"

Enjoy corn during the season. (Alejandra Owens)

From Alejandra Owens. You can find her at her food blog, One Bite At A Time. Alejandra also writes for City Eats DC, a Food Network site, where you can book dinner reservations. Follow her on Twitter at @frijolita and email her at alejandra[AT]borderstan.com.

I should start off by saying, I am not the biggest corn fan. It’s seriously in season at the markets right now and a quick skim of all the food blogs shows an abundance of recipes for corn chowder or corn and bean salads or worse…cornbread with corn actually in it. The horror! Nope. I don’t don’t go gaga over the stuff, but for two preparations: popped or grilled. Today, I’m here to share with you my grilled corn recipe, which really is no secret to Paula Deen lovers and those from the South.

Be prepared for mess, or ask, as I did, a dinner companion to “help.” Which is to say, you sprinkle or splarge the ingredients on the corn while they do the spreading or rotating.

Step One: Place one cleaned ear of corn in the middle of a piece of aluminum foil large enough to completely wrap around it.

Step Two: Splarge (a very technical term) 1-2 tablespoons of mayo (yes, I said mayo) onto the corn and evenly spread it over the whole ear of corn.

Step Three: Sprinkle Cholula dry seasoning evenly all over the ear of corn. Sprinkle finely grated parmesan all over the ear of corn, completely coating it in cheese. Feelin’ like something spicy? Add a few dashes of Tabasco sauce!

Step Four: You’ll probably want to wash your hands at this point…then wrap it all up in the foil and place on a hot grill (300-350 degrees) for 15 minutes or so.

Step Five: Unwrap corn and devour.

I mean really, how can this be bad? It can’t. And I’m not even a huge fan of mayo as a condiment! Basically whenever I make this grilled corn I become fixated on it, unable to speak or eat anything else until I’ve consumed the entire ear. True story. The stuff is addictive.

Make a few ears for your BBQ this week and let me know what you think!

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by Borderstan.com July 5, 2012 at 12:00 pm 0

From Namita Koppa. Email her at namita[AT]borderstan.com.

Question: Have you ever seen a sad person at a farmers’ market? Probably not, right? A leisurely weekend morning walk through Dupont’s stands of gorgeous produce and fresh-baked pastries is hardly the type of thing to bring up tears or frustrations. It’s an amazing experience to chat with the person who actually grew that perfect tomato you’re taking home, or to even learn that sweet potato greens exist (a very good thing, I assure you!). In Borderstan, we are very lucky to have multiple farmers’ markets available within walking distance, including the Dupont Farmers Market (Sundays) and the 14 and U Farmers Market (Saturdays).

As the local food movement takes off across the country, increasing research argues that where our food comes from, its environmental effects, and how food is processed affects not only our health, but also our economic well-being. Recently, NPR’s The Salt released this sobering analysis about the impact of meat consumption.

Real Time Farms a Nationwide Food Guide

In 2010, Real Time Farms, a crowd-sourced, nationwide food guide, opened its doors and website. Using data collected by citizens, Real Time Farms maps where, when, and what products are available from farmers, farmers’ markets, food artisans, and restaurants, allowing users to make informed choices about their food consumption.

To learn why Real Time Farms began, check this TED talk delivered by Co-Founder Cara Rosaen. Locally find out what DC Food Warrior Rachel Lupberger is doing this summer.

"Rachel Lupberger"

Rachel Lupberger from Real Time Farms. (Namita Koppa)

Recently, I chatted with Rachel Lupberger, Real Time Farms’ DC Food Warrior. Charged with mapping the DC food landscape, Rachel will spend her summer interviewing, photographing, and filming members of the District’s local food system. Inspired by her childhood in the suburbs of DC and her undergraduate studies at Lewis & Clark College, she has been surprised to learn what the food system is like here.

Speaking of a recent visit to the Dupont Circle Farmers Market, Rachel said, “Finding out the closest farms are an hour, two hours, three hours away…there’s not really easy access to fresh produce in lower-income communities… I still think about it being a more [of a] middle class thing.”

As Rachel moves through her Food Warrior internship this summer, she has graciously agreed to keep us posted on her findings. To read more about her adventures, check out her Food Warrior webpage.

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by Borderstan.com June 22, 2012 at 12:00 pm 1,821 1 Comment

From Alejandra Owens. You can find her at her food blog, One Bite At A Time. Alejandra also writes for City Eats DC, a Food Network site, where you can book dinner reservations. Follow her on Twitter at @frijolita and email her at alejandra[AT]borderstan.com.

"Cherries at the Farmers Market"

Just waiting to be made into Cherry Almond Cake. (Alejandra Owens)

Cherries are, by far, my favorite summer fruit. Mostly because they’re a fruit that doubles as interactive sport. Uncouth as it may be, I’m a pro cherry pit spitter. Slam dunks into trash cans, spot on target practice with unwitting victims (usually our dogs back at home)…I say screw it with that pseudo-sexual cherry stem tying shit and go right for the pit spitting.

But I also enjoy cherries and their robust flavor for baking. Last summer I had procured, per usual, too many pints of cherries and had to do something with them. (Why am I always baking at the last possible ripened minute?) After watching some Cooking Chanel, I decided to play around with one of my favorite cherry pairings, almonds, and a cake a recipe that seemed nice enough, but really dull.

The result was my cherry almond cake. It was moist, fluffy and had a nice crumb to it. It’s a perfect breakfast cake or light dessert, you need only brave the pain of pitting all the cherries because this particular cake is so damn easy to pull together!

What will you be making with cherries this season? Anyone making ice creams sans an ice cream maker lately? I’d love some tips and recipes if you’d like to share!

Cherry Almond Cake

Inspired by Laura Calder’s Angel Cakeand the cherry almond scones at Dolcezza in Dupont Circle.

  • 6 eggs, separated
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/1 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1 cup sifted all-purpose flour
  • 1-1 1/2c pitted, rough chopped cherries (very rough, cut each half in half)
  • 1/4c ground almonds, 1 tbsp sliced almonds
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Grease and line a 9-inch springform pan.
  2. Beat the whites to stiff peaks in a bowl. Beat in the yolks, one by one. Continuing to beat, add the sugar and vanilla, and finally the flour. You should have a very high, moussy batter. Gently fold in the cherries and ground almonds.
  3. Pour the batter into the pan and sprinkle with sliced almonds. Bake until golden on top, risen high, and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 1 hour. Let the cake cool 15 minutes. Remove the sides of the pan and let cool completely. Transfer the cake to a serving platter.
  4. Serve with whipped cream, creme fraiche, parfait, or ice cream. Ideally I would have eaten this, I mean, served this, with creme fraiche…but it was just me. And I didn’t have time to make creme fraiche. I wanted to eat it all. Now. But for you guys, who might take this to a party, serve it with creme fraiche!

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by Borderstan.com June 15, 2012 at 1:00 pm 1,332 0

"Garlic Scapes"

Garlic Scapes. (Chelsea Rinnig)

From Chelsea Rinnig. Email her at chelsea[AT}borderstan.com

Did I mention I work at the farmers market? Yep, and as I check folks out with all their bounty, many are baffled by the relatives of traditional, bolder garlic and onions: garlic scapes. Shallots, leeks and chives, once relatively uncommon, have been popularized and are regulars on our plates.

But my new favorite of the bunch that has solicited the most questioning and bug-eyed stares are the sprawling garlic scapes. Twisting like vines out of boxes at many of the market’s vegetable stands, they’re up there with kohlrabi in the weird factor.

Most will pick up a bunch as an impulse purchase, but few realize how powerful these tall-stemmed garlic really are. I find that one strand is enough to compensate for three or four cloves of garlic, and certainly leaves the same potent fragrance as its cousin. One advantage the scape has, though, is that it is much easier to deal with.

Garlic scapes require no peeling or crushing and can simply be chopped from the stem to the base of the small bulb (which, though edible, can be a bit more bitter than stalk).

Include garlic scapes in place of normal garlic and reduce your prep time (and meticulous mincing frustrations) dramatically. If you’re at all like me, you totally splurged, went for the bundle of garlic scapes and now have more than you know what to do with. I took this as an opportunity to make a new pesto — garlic scape pesto is bold, bright and flavorful, and can use the entire stalk of the scape without waste.

This recipe can easily adapt for various food allergies by omitting nuts and/or substituting with sunflower seeds. I have seen a few recipes include vegan cheeses or ricotta as an option as well. For those looking to play around a bit, try adding a few basil leaves, parsley or any other fresh herb and see how the flavor profile changes.

Pesto is great to have on hand for those nights when you just don’t have the energy to do more than boil pasta. I even put my pesto on top of brown rice or quinoa, chill it for cold pasta salads or spread it over toast on an egg sandwich. What did you do with your garlic scapes? Let me know and I’ll give it a shot too!

Ingredients and Prep

  • 1/2 lb. garlic scapes (about 15 scapes)
  • 3/4 cup grated parmesan
  • 1/3 cup walnuts
  • 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • juice from half a lemon
  1. Roughly chop the garlic scapes before combining all ingredients into a food processor or blender.
  2. I also like to add a little zest for the lemon before I juice it as well.
  3. Serve immediately over cooked pasta or store in an airtight container in the fridge or freezer.

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by Borderstan.com June 8, 2012 at 2:00 pm 1,587 0

"Raspberries"

Raspberries: roast them! (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Alejandra Owens. You can find her at her food blog, One Bite At A Time. Alejandra also writes for City Eats DC, a Food Network site, where you can book dinner reservations. Follow her on Twitter at @frijolita and email her at alejandra[AT]borderstan.com.

Little orbs of red lip stain. Or little orbs of why-do-I-ever-wear-white stain. That’s two ways of looking at raspberries, regardless, they’re making their debut at the farmers markets. Last week, you could find them at 14th and U Street market!

While a half pint of these little summer jewels can set you back $4 or more, I think they’re worth the price. And at that price, you’ll want to get every last juicy dribble of flavor out of them. May I introduce you to the idea of low and slow, roasted berries? Oh, hello Ina Garten, fancy seeing you here! What’s a gal like you doing in a blog like this!? Combine all the summer berries you like, or maybe go mono-berry, combine them with sugar and vanilla (maybe throw a tablespoon or two of rum or bourbon in there) and what you’ll get the most intense berry juice and compote-like topping for ice cream, pound cake, angel food cake or even as a filler for a galette! Brunch tip: drizzle 2 teaspoons in the bottom of a champagne glass filled to the brim with your favorite bubbly!

Brunch tip: drizzle 2 teaspoons in the bottom of a champagne glass filled to the brim with your favorite bubbly!

Of course raspberries would be perfect in scones, biscuits, and tarts too! What is your favorite thing to do with summer berries?

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