by Borderstan Contributor — November 16, 2015 at 12:40 pm 0

By ANC 2B Commissioner Nicole Mann

Traveling to a foreign country with limited phone and internet service is frustrating to begin with, but the stress is tenfold realizing everyone in the room is checking their cell phones in a panic and you’re left feeling uninformed.

I was sitting in a restaurant in central Paris on Friday evening, on vacation with a friend to get a feel for a foreign culture I had never experienced before. I had the overwhelming feeling that something important had happened when the Parisians at tables around me began to scroll through their phones in nervous whispers, receiving phone calls from friends seemingly all at once.

They were speaking in French, and I didn’t understand a word. I couldn’t stand sitting in the dark, so I switched on my data plan to check the internet against my better judgement.
Immediately the source of tension in the room became clear: there had been attacks in central Paris.

So many different reports were coming in — bombings, shootings, hostages — that, at first, I was skeptical. Surely something had occurred, but often initial reports on Twitter are hyperbolic and inaccurate, so at the time with limited information, I assumed the likelihood of all three reports was slim. I was wrong.

In the next few minutes the busy restaurant had fallen into a nervous dialogue. I don’t speak French, but I could still interpret the conversations: each Parisian was reporting that they were safe on social media, checking phones for updates, receiving calls from concerned friends and family, and rushing to be the first to report new information to the table as the initial speculation became fact.

Bombs had gone off at a stadium outside the central city. There were shootings outside restaurants about a 15 minute stroll from where we sat. And there were hostages held inside of a concert hall not far away.

We paid our check and rushed back to the hotel, flipped on CNN international, and checked Twitter for news.

As is usual with breaking news, Twitter is both the best and worst source to consult. While much of it was informative, just as much was inaccurate. Reports were flowing in about additional bombings and an active shooter at Centre Pompidou and Les Halles – both about two blocks from our hotel, and both of which we had walked by only hours before.

We didn’t believe it – we were convinced we would have heard the commotion from where we were. Anxious to be engaged in the story, we left the hotel to confirm, and walked to both places. They were silent and empty, and we reported back that the speculation was unfounded.

By then, Paris had been essentially shut down by a curfew, a purported first in the city since WWII. But people were still milling about. Emergency vehicles raced down the streets in large caravans every few minutes but otherwise the neighborhood was still. There were active shooters around the city, motives unknown at the time, but no one seemed panicked.

The next morning, with museums closed, we had nothing much else to do but to walk around the city. Our lunch waitress seemed stressed and fatigued but not scared. Some shops were closed, some were open, and some had been adorned by makeshift memorials; a black sheet draped over the door, a black winter scarf tied around a sign.

A salesmen at a clothing store browsing his phone spoke limited English, but asked us if we were American. He showed us a photo of the Empire State Building colored in blue, white, and red.

“Have you seen this?” We had.

“It is beautiful. That this is for us. It is lovely. We appreciate it.” His words were genuine; he was not fearful or shaken. Rather, he seemed resolved, proud; he had had his store open all day.

I told him we had appreciated, too.

That night we visited the memorials at each of the affected sites. Crowds of mourning Parisians were littered with news trucks and live shots, but the Parisians ignored them. The mourners were subdued and quiet.

Next to the memorial near the concert hall where hostages had been taken, a neighborhood bar was open — and packed! The crowd at the bar was so large, it had spilled out onto the sidewalk, but they weren’t sitting at tables sipping beers. Instead, they were standing and drinking in large masses, laughing and loud and tipsy and noisy and excited as though watching a sports game.

Fifty feet from the candlelit memorial, the news crews, and the blood-spattered street, Paris was still alive. I think that was the best way I could ever have experienced French culture.

Nicole Mann is an ANC 2B commissioner. Follow her on Twitter here.

by Tim Regan — November 12, 2015 at 3:55 pm 5 Comments

Commissioners with Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B had some strong words for Claudia’s Steakhouse (1501 K St. NW) over allegations that the restaurant repeatedly blocked a sidewalk and bike lane along 15th Street NW several times since it opened in June.

Marlon Alfaro, general manager at Claudia’s; David Bowing, assistant general manager at Claudia’s; and Ben Tesfaye, valet parking manager for Claudia’s valet company, U Street Parking, attended the ANC’s monthly meeting on Tuesday to request that two metered parking spaces near the restaurant be allocated for evening valet parking use.

“[The restaurant] is located in an area where parking is difficult,” Tesfaye said. “There are garages in the area, but unfortunately they do close early.”

“We’re looking at eight to ten cars a night,” he continued. “Two, three people per car, spending $35 or $40, that’s a lot of revenue for the restaurant.”

But ANC 2B chair Noah Smith had some criticisms for the steakhouse’s previous operations along that stretch of 15th Street. (more…)

by Tim Regan — October 16, 2015 at 12:10 pm 3 Comments

Midtown Partyplex (1219 Connecticut Ave. NW) may harbor multiple “safety concerns,” said Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B during its monthly meeting at the Brookings Institution (1775 Massachusetts Avenue NW) on Wednesday.

The commission voted 4-0-1 to send a letter to the Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) board in advance of an Oct. 21 protest hearing concerning the renewal of Midtown’s alcohol license.

“Since [November 2013], ANC 2B has become aware of numerous other problems at Midtown as documented in ABRA’s investigation history,” reads the letter. “Serious problems requiring ABC Board attention since the ‘expiration’ of the license of the license on Sept. 30, 2013, comprise underage drinking and violence including death, assault on police officers and sexual assault.”

Commissioner Abigail Nichols, 2B-05, is the one who motioned to send the letter.

Nichols noted that the ANC first voted to protest the bar’s license due to noise complaints from neighbors in November, 2013. Since then, she said, the ANC became aware of more serious problems.

“In those two years after, other kinds of operational problems have come to my attention as the commissioner for that area,” she said. “In 2013, there was a brouhaha in which people fighting inside Midtown were thrown out onto the street. One man died. Two police officers went to the hospital,” said Nichols.

“Midtown made the papers again in february about a week after they reopened after they closed down for underage drinking and assorted things,” she added.

“What we are doing here with this letter is not trying them for those things,” Nichols said. “What this is doing is saying to the board, we noticed this pattern, we ask that you take action.”

“This is a very large nightclub with lots of dark corners,” Nichols added. “Commissioner Michael Upright, [2B-04] and I went to the police headquarters Sunday just to see if we were overstating the nature of the problem, but we looked at this list of violations and problems that the police have been called for and I’m confident we’re not overstating the level of problems there.”

by Tim Regan — October 15, 2015 at 10:55 am 0

Dupont Circle residents, meet your newest ANC Commissioner.

Locals overwhelmingly voted in favor of candidate John Kupcinski during a special election at ANC 2B’s general meeting at the Brookings Institution (1775 Massachusetts Avenue NW) last night.

The meeting started with a ceremonial ballot box unveiling from Director of the Office of ANCs, Gottlieb Simon. The director, with help from Mike Silverstein, 2B-06, then sealed the box with tape and officially opened the voting period. Neighbors who live in the ANC’s 2B-07 single member district — including Greater Greater Washington’s David Alpert — filed in throughout the night to cast their votes.

In the end, Kupcinski won 31 votes. His opponent, Holly Biglow, received seven. In the hallway after the election, defeated candidate Biglow was all smiles.

“I’m really happy to have been apart of this process,” she said. “This is my very first time running for something. I was glad to be apart of it.”

Moving forward, Kupcinski said the St. Thomas Church renovation, traffic issues and local development will be at the top of his agenda after he’s sworn in.

“I would need to sit down with the other ANC commissioners first, but … the traffic situation at 18th and P [streets NW] is just horrendous,” he said. “There’s also a lot of development that’s going on, especially at the Patterson Mansion … and Dupont Underground is going to be more and more important as we move forward with that project.”

by Tim Regan — October 14, 2015 at 12:10 pm 0

2B Special Election

Some Dupont Circle residents will have the chance to elect a new ANC commissioner tonight.

ANC 2B will tally votes tonight during a special election for former commissioner Justine Underhill’s 2B-07 seat, which was vacated in August when Underhill moved to New York City. Voting takes place between 7:30 p.m. and 9 p.m. during tonight’s ANC 2B meeting at the Brookings Institution (1775 Massachusetts Avenue NW) near Dupont Circle.

Dupont residents Holly Biglow and John Kupcinski have entered into the race for the 2B-07 seat. In previous interviews with Borderstan, both candidates have said weighing in on the planned St. Thomas Church development is at the top of their agenda if elected.

“First and foremost, … I’d like to try to [figure out] how the construction is going to happen [at the St. Thomas’ Parish], how the operations will work, how the pre-construction, construction will work,” said Kupcinski. “Just make sure there aren’t any misunderstandings. It’s going to be one of the biggest developments happening in 2B-07.”

“I know the St. Thomas Church project is a very large project,” Biglow told us. “It’s very important to the community, so that will be the number one issue that will have to be addressed.”

According to ANC 2B chair Noah Smith, 2B-09, ballots will be available in the back of the ANC meeting room. D.C. Director of the Office of ANCs, Gottlieb Simon, will check in voters as they arrive. Locals do not need to stay for the entire meeting to cast a vote, added Smith.

by Tim Regan — September 28, 2015 at 12:15 pm 0

Candidate Holly Biglow touched upon the St. Thomas Church development project in her speech

Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B is getting ready for a special election.

Residents Holly Biglow and John Kupcinski have entered into a race for former commissioner Justine Underhill’s 2B-07 seat, which was vacated in August when Underhill moved to New York City. Earlier this month, you heard from Kupcinski. Now, here’s your chance to hear from Biglow:

Borderstan: Tell me a little bit about why you decided to run for the 2B-07 seat.

I’ve been in the neighborhood for six years. I love the neighborhood. I love my community. I love the diversity. I love what my neighborhood stands for. I want to be apart of it. I am apart of my condominium association, so I do like being involved however I can, especially regarding where I live.

You previously thought about running for this seat, didn’t you?

When Justine [Underhill] ran, I was also interested, but I met and I spoke to her and I didn’t go through with getting signatures or anything like that.

So you didn’t run, but you were thinking about it.

Exactly. I was just interested, but I met with her and she was very passionate about it, so I sort of stepped back.

If you are elected, what will be one of your first priorities?

I know the St. Thomas Church project is a very large project. It’s very important to the community, so that will be the number one issue that will have to be addressed.

After that, I would like to work closely or continue to work with the surrounding businesses, such as the restaurants. I know there’s a lot more competition in D.C., which is driving a lot of patrons to go to different parts of D.C. I want to try to keep our area vibrant and as active as it currently it. I would definitely like to work more to try to keep the businesses in our area.

I think congestion will be addressed eventually. Traffic congestion. I’m not sure about people congestion, but I know that is a concern, especially considering the St. Thomas street project and some of the other condos that are being developed in the neighborhood, such as the Patterson House. That’s one of the things I would definitely like to keep an eye out on.

In what ways would you work with the businesses to keep patrons here?

I know that normally the businesses come to the ANC to get approval on their patios or what they can and can’t do in terms of their liquor license, or can they play music or not? I think just sort of working in that regard and being open-minded and looking in a business sense to make sure that I’m helping them to thrive and keep customers coming into our neighborhood.

I do know that the ANC scope is limited, but when they approach the ANC with things they might want to do to boost their business, instead of saying no, [I want to] look at it more like, we do want to keep people coming into the neighborhood, how can we work together and keep the neighborhood thriving?

How do you plan to interact with other neighborhood associations, if elected?

Like I said in my speech at the last ANC meeting, I’m a very open-minded person. I like working with different organizations and coalitions. That would continue with any association if I were elected to the ANC.

How would you use social media to engage with your potential future constituents?

I’m a Facebook user. I would probably use Facebook and keep people updated through Facebook. That would be my route.

Is there anything you’d want to change in the way ANC 2B operates?

Nothing that I can pinpoint right now. But I feel like the commissioners are easy to work with and they’re very nice people. I’m sure if something did come about, they would probably consider my suggestions if there’s anything that I think would need to be changed. The meetings run pretty smoothly.

Residents of the 2B-07 single member district can cast their ballots next month at the Brookings Institution on Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m.

Click here for more information regarding voter eligibility and the voting process.

This interview was edited for length and clarity

by Tim Regan — September 16, 2015 at 1:30 pm 4 Comments

John Kupcinski at anc2b meeting

Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B is getting ready for a special election.

Residents Holly Biglow and John Kupcinski have entered into a race for former commissioner Justine Underhill’s 2B-07 seat, which was vacated last month when Underhill moved to New York City. Now, here’s your chance to hear from one of them.

We spoke with Kupcinski about some of the local issues he feels strongly about:

Borderstan: Tell me a little bit about why you decided to run for the 2B-07 seat.

John Kupcinski: I’ve been involved in neighborhood politics, I purchased my property about a year and a half ago or so. I made a fairly big investment. It’s the biggest purchase I’ll probably ever make in my entire life So I wanted to make a big investment in the community as well. I got involved with Church Street Neighbors. Meeting the people who are my neighbors, I’m a proponent of trying to make things better. I felt like this is one of the ways I could contribute to the community.

If you are elected, what will be one of your first priorities?

First and foremost, … I’d like to try to [figure out] how the construction is going to happen [at the St. Thomas’ Parish], how the operations will work, how the pre-construction, construction will work. Just make sure there aren’t any misunderstandings. It’s going to be one of the biggest developments happening in 2B-07.

How do you plan to interact with other neighborhood associations, if elected?

It’s important to have people’s voices heard. One of the things we’re blessed with in 2B-07 is that we have a lot of very active and engaged community members who have decided to participate in the political process. So that, I think, is a fantastic benefit and also something that can help whoever the ANC commissioner is in October. I would see those organizations as a conduit for ideas and to help out with initiatives and to be able to provide communication back and forth between constituent groups within the neighborhood.

Is there anything you’d want to change in the way ANC 2B operates?

This is kind of a non-answer, but my perception has been on the other side of the microphone. So, I would need to get in and see the workings of how things are happening. I don’t know yet. But I am looking forward to working with everybody. I think that everybody in the ANC has a significant amount to give and contribute. They’ve made the neighborhood a better place to live in. I’m excited about working with everybody.

You said previously that, even if you don’t win the election, you’ll still be involved in the community. Are there specific things you’d undertake?

I’ve been very fortunate to, through this process, to meet a number of the different neighbors and develop a lot of close friendships. I would get involved in [Dupont Circle Citizens Association] or Church Street Neighbors or even work with a message board that people are active on within the community.

How will you use social media to engage with your potential future constituents?

My Twitter is very professional. Mostly articles that I think are interesting with respect to information security. One of the things that I would like to do is find a way to engage people on social media, whether that be on Twitter, create a 2B-07 media account. Using other blogs. I know the ANC has a blog. But I’d try to find as many ways to reach out to people.

Residents of the 2B-07 single member district can cast their ballots next month at the Brookings Institution on Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m.

Click here for more information regarding voter eligibility and the voting process.

by Borderstan Contributor — September 11, 2015 at 3:30 pm 0

Mike Silverstein, photo via ANC 2BMike Silverstein is an ANC 2B commissioner, an Alcoholic Beverage Control board member and a former journalist.

Last week, he wrote to us and shared a touching story about a series of events that occurred exactly ten years ago today. We thought the story, a tale about the rescue of a dog during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, was best told in the commissioner’s own words.

I found these items among my souvenirs — keepsakes of a story that happened ten years ago this week. It’s a story how three people from DC somehow joined together to save the life of a dog in New Orleans.

Hurricane Katrina had destroyed parts of the Gulf Coast more than a week earlier, and much of New Orleans was still under water.

I was at work at ABC News on DeSales Street when I got a call from my good friend Emmett Woolfrey, who had moved from D.C. to New Orleans several years earlier. Emmett had safely evacuated to Baton Rouge. He called to ask if there was any way to help his friend, a fellow hospital technician names James Coates. James had been forced to leave his dog Chanelle behind, with a maybe a week’s worth of food and some bowls full of water. James was terrified that the water was running out, and Chanelle would die of dehydration.

I had seen a story about animal rescues (this was twelve days after the storm hit), and tried to contact the group that was coordinating those efforts. I was unable to reach the woman in charge by phone, so I sent her an e-mail. It was, in retrospect, a bit melodramatic, but I wanted to get her attention.

Mike SIlverstein e-mail on Sept. 11 2005

I never did hear from Ellen, but the results were even better. The next day, I got a phone call from a neighbor. It was Scotlund Haisley, from Georgetown, whom I knew both from Montrose Park and from the Washington Animal Rescue League. He said he was calling from New Orleans, from a boat, headed down a flooded street, and on his way to try to find Chanelle. He was asking for specific instructions on how to find James’ apartment. Fortunately, I had met James at Mardi Gras 2002, and had stopped by his apartment before one of the parades, so I could describe the house and the path back to James’ apartment. The directions were all that Scotlund needed. He said he’d get back to me after he found Chanelle.

An hour later, he called back, and said he had found her and she was in bad shape. She was near death from dehydration, and was unconscious and barely breathing. He said he was taking her to a hospital unit to get an IV into her. Later, he had her taken up to LSU in Baton Rouge, where veterinary doctors stabilized her, and put her on the road to recovery. Scotlund, meanwhile, went back to searching abandoned and ruined homes for animals to be rescued.


Scotlund called me about a week later, and told me Chanelle was well enough to be reunited with James. Eventually, James and Chanelle returned to New Orleans, and he sent me this picture, which speaks for itself.

The rescued dog and its happy owner

Chanelle lived to be 14 years old, and was James’ best friend and faithful companion. Her tongue was always too big for her mouth, and it always stuck out, especially when she was happy. Sadly, James died last year. Emmett now lives in Florida. And Scotund, who left the Animal Rescue League to work with the Humane Society, now works with the Animal Rescue Corps, a group that rescues animals after natural disasters and from abusive situations.

Very few good things came out of Katrina, but one was a change in the way animals are treated in disaster evacuations. We are no longer forced to choose either to stay behind with our pets or to evacuate and leave our animal companions behind. Our dogs and cats are members of our families. They can come with us, and their love and loyalty can help see us through whatever storms we must endure.

It’s a lesson I learned ten years ago this week, a lesson with a happy ending.

Photos courtesy of Mike Silverstein and ANC 2B

by Tim Regan — September 10, 2015 at 10:30 am 0

Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B is getting ready for a special election.

Residents Holly Biglow and John Kupcinski have entered into a race for former commissioner Justine Underhill’s 2B-07 seat, which was vacated last month when Underhill moved to New York City.

The two candidates introduced themselves and touched upon community issues during “stump speeches” at last night’s ANC 2B meeting at the Brookings Institution (1775 Massachusetts Avenue NW) near Dupont Circle.

Holly Biglow, who said she’s lived in P Street NW for six years, touched upon the hotly debated issue of the St. Thomas Church development project.

“I am aware of the St. Thomas Church development project, which I know has been a major issue. I’m also aware that a neighborhood group has developed work on some of the issues they have regarding this project,” Biglow said. “I definitely commend them on all the work that they’ve done and all the things that they’ve accomplished.”

“I really look forward to working with the group if possible to continue to address the neighbor’s needs,” she added.

“This neighborhood has various issues that need to be addressed,” Biglow concluded. “I’m a very open-minded person. I really look forward to working on a vast number of issues that ANC 2B-07 and the rest of the ANC will be working on.”

Kupcinski, who owns a consulting firm in the area, then stepped in front of the microphone to introduce himself.

“I’ve been involved in the community ever since I purchased [my home] about a year and a half ago,” said Kupcinski. “I got involved in the Church Street neighbors. I got to meet lots of our wonderful neighbors and our ANC.”

“I’ve been to a lot of ANC meetings,” he added. “I’m excited about Dupont, both what it was and what it’s growing into be. I think that we’re at a very interesting point in terms of the changing dynamics and shifts as other parts of the city continue to develop.”

“Regardless of the outcome of the election, I’m still going to be involved,” he said. “You’ll still see my face on a monthly basis. You’ll still see me walking my dog around the neighborhood.”

Newly revived ANC blog Short Articles About Long Meetings recorded both speeches and uploaded them to Youtube earlier this morning.

Residents of the 2B-07 single member district can cast their ballots next month at the Brookings Institution on Oct. 14 at 7:30 p.m.

Click here for more information regarding voter eligibility and the voting process.

by Tim Regan — August 13, 2015 at 2:45 pm 0

Farragut West Metro station, photo via Flickr.com/Matt' Johnson(Updated at 5:08 p.m.) Golden Triangle BID would like to change the Farragut West Metro station’s name.

The business improvement district last night asked Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B to consider urging WMATA to add “White House” to the station’s title.

Ted Jutras, Golden Triangle BID’s planning manager, laid out the organization’s case at the meeting.

“With the silver line extension coming to Dulles and a lot of the tourist traffic coming in, Farragut West will be the most convenient first stop for the White House,” Jutras explained. “From a neighborhood standpoint, increased foot traffic in the area would help the businesses on our side of the White House.”

Jutras added that adding the words “White House” to the Farragut West Metro station may also prevent photo-seeking tourists from traveling all the way to Metro Center in search of the iconic residence and therefore prevent congestion.

Jutras said the district would like to submit the suggestion in time for WMATA to consider it during the agency’s upcoming station name and map revision period.

Leona Agouridis, executive director of Golden Triangle BID, is working on a draft of a letter to WMATA urging the agency to change the station’s name, added Jutras.

Commissioner Mike Feldstein, 2B-01, then said he’d like to remind the room that it was the commission, not the BID, that suggested adding “White House” to the station’s name.

“Golden Triangle came to us and asked to change the name of that station to Golden Triangle,” Feldstein said. “We argued the name should be changed to the White House.”

Other commissioners followed with concerns.

“I’m actually not sure if it is closer [to the White House] than McPherson Square,” said  Commissioner Daniel Warwick, 2B-02. “And if you just add it to Farragut West, maybe people on the Red Line would go to Metro Center and then transfer to Farragut West.”

“With regard to Farragut North, for exactly that reason, we would support if Metro wanted to add ‘White House’ to Farragut North as well,” responded Jutras.

“As I listen to this, I’m struck by the confusion that this would cause,” said Commissioner Abigail Nichols, 2B-05. Nichols added that, if Farragut North and Farragut West would include the words “White House,” why wouldn’t McPherson Square due to its closer proximity to the White House?

“As McPherson is not within the Golden Triangle BID, we’re not taking a stance on McPherson,” responded Jutras. “The resolution as it’s put forward is for Farragut West. The BID would also fully support adding White House to the name Farragut North.”

When put to a vote, the resolution failed 1-6-0.

Chairman and Commissioner Noah Smith, 2B-09, summed up his thoughts before moving on to another resolution.

“I don’t think we have a lot of angst with the idea of changing names,” Smith said. “We’re not married to Farragut West by any means. But I personally would suggest a more comprehensive plan.”

Photo via Flickr.com/Matt’ Johnson

by Tim Regan — August 13, 2015 at 11:05 am 1 Comment

ANC 2B meeting Aug 13Residents who live near the Carlyle Hotel (1731 New Hampshire Avenue NW) gathered at last night’s ANC 2B meeting to debate and air grievances regarding a rooftop bar and kitchen proposed by the hotel and recently permitted by the D.C. Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA).

Prior to the meeting, residents asked the ANC’s commissioners to vote on a measure to appeal the hotel’s building permit. Commissioners agreed to vote — citing in the appeal itself a belief that the Zoning Administrator “incorrectly applied the zoning regulations” — but stressed that the appeal would be a last-resort option.

“The point of this is that the neighbor’s concerns will be heard,” said Chairman Noah Smith, 2B-09. “We are not against having something on the roof,” he added. “But there are very serious and valid concerns about what was approved.”

Several residents then took the floor to speak their minds.


by Tim Regan — July 20, 2015 at 4:30 pm 0

-06.01-DuPont-webres-39Some Dupont Circle residents will soon have the chance to dive into local politics.

ANC 2B formally announced yesterday that it needs a new commissioner for its 2B07 seat.

“Earlier this month Commissioner Justine Underhill announced her resignation from the Dupont Circle ANC to pursue a career opportunity outside of Washington,” reads the announcement. “On July 17, the Board of Elections certified a vacancy for single member district 2B07 and today we are seeking a committed and enthusiastic resident of 2B07 to fill that position.”

“Commissioner Underhill has been invaluable in bringing the neighborhood together around issues big and small, including the ongoing development process of the St. Thomas Church property at 1772 Church [Street NW],” continues the announcement.

To qualify for the election, candidates must live in 2B07, a small area immediately east and southeast of Dupont Circle.

Potential candidates must also collect 25 signatures of registered voters who live in 2B07 by Aug. 10.

A special election will be held in September or October if two or more candidates successfully file petitions.

If there is only one candidate, that person will be certified as the 2B07 commissioner.

If there are no candidates, the D.C. Board of Elections will continue to declare the vacancy until a candidate steps forward.

Locals can pick up nominating petitions at the D.C. Board of Elections office, which is located at 441 4th Street NW.

by Tim Regan — July 17, 2015 at 10:30 am 0

17thliquorThe D.C. ABC Board wants to hear from the public regarding a proposal by Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B to end the liquor license moratorium in West Dupont Circle.

The proposal, which the ANC voted to approve in May, asks the ABC board not to extend its moratorium on new liquor licenses in the area. The proposal also asks that the board renew its moratorium on new nightclub liquor licenses in West Dupont Circle for another three years.

During the hearing, which occurs at 2000 14th Street NW next Wednesday at 10 a.m., locals will be able to share their thoughts on ending the moratorium.

Residents who want to comment at the hearing should contact ABRA General Counsel Martha Jenkins by 5 p.m. next Monday with their full name, title and organization, if applicable.

Public comment may be limited to five minutes in order to allow every person an opportunity to be heard. ABRA advises that those wanting to weigh in should bring nine copies of their testimony.

by Tim Regan — June 5, 2015 at 10:50 am 0

Leo Dwyer, Photo via ANC2BFormer Dupont Circle ANC 2B Commissioner Robert “Leo” Dwyer has been found guilty of a hate crime for assaulting a homeless man last summer at the intersection of 17th and Corcoran streets NW.

Dwyer will be sentenced on Aug 11. He faces a up to 270 days of incarceration and a potential fine of up to $1,500.

Police say that on July 28, 2014, Dwyer threw a homeless man’s bedding onto the street, dumped his belongings in a trash bin and sprayed the area with a cleaning solution.

The report also says that Dwyer sprayed the cleaning solution into another homeless man’s face when that man rode past Dwyer on a bike.

During the assault, police say Dwyer used a racial slur and profanity in declaring that he hated homeless people “dirtying up the streets.”  Police say he also told an eyewitness that he “hate[d] these people sleeping here.”

“Robert Dwyer targeted this victim for assault because he was homeless,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Vincent H. Cohen, Jr. in a press release.  “This prosecution vindicates the principle that everyone in our community deserves the protection of the law.  We will not tolerate this reprehensible behavior in the District of Columbia.”

According to a Washington Blade article, 18 ANC commissioners issued a joint statement urging Dwyer to resign last August.

Photo via ANC 2B

by Tim Regan — June 2, 2015 at 4:00 pm 0

Police Car

Dupont Circle’s ANC 2B will host a crime prevention summit on June 6 at the Cardozo Education Campus near U Street.

The summit, which lasts from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., is intended for D.C. residents in Wards 1 and 2.

Speakers will include Samantha Nolan, a crime prevention expert and certified Neighborhood Watch Trainer, in addition to officials from the Metropolitan Police Department and Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department.

The event is co-sponsored by ANCs 1B, 1A, 2B and Ward 1 Councilmember Brianne Nadeau.

“Most crimes in DC are preventable,” reads a document outlining the meeting’s  agenda. “Being aware of your surroundings and watching where you leave personal belongings can help you from not becoming a victim. Please join us to learn more tips on how to protect yourself and about criminal behaviors that can help you and your neighborhood be safe this summer.”

“The summit is a great opportunity for residents of Wards 1 and 2 to discuss crime prevention, while meeting interested neighbors, business leaders, police officials and D.C. agencies that focus on public safety,” reads the agenda document.

Light refreshments will be served during the summit. For more information, contact ANC 1B12 Commissioner John Green at [email protected]


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