by Borderstan.com November 14, 2012 at 8:00 am 1,365 0

"school"

Garrison Elementary School. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

On Tuesday, Nov. 13, DC Public Schools (DCPS) Chancellor Kaya Henderson announced a proposal to close 20 schools in six wards across the city.

Among the schools on the list–which includes eight elementary schools, two education campuses, four middle schools, one high school, one STAY program, the CHOICE program and three special education campuses–are two schools in the Borderstan area. Both Garrison Elementary School (1200 S Street NW) and Shaw at Garnet-Patterson Middle School (2001 10th Street NW) are expected to close for the 2013-2014 school year.

“The challenge we face in DCPS is clear — our buildings are wildly under-enrolled, our resources are stretched too thin and we’re not providing the complement of academic supports that our students and families deserve,” said Henderson.

“Consolidating schools is our best option to better utilize our facilities and work more efficiently for our schools, our teachers, our students and our city.”

Community members took to area listservs after the announcement was made, and the Garrison PTA sent an email to local residents urging them to testify at the School Closures Hearings. The hearings are scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 15 from 4 pm to 8pm and Monday, Nov. 19 from 2 pm to 6 pm.

According to DC Public Schools, the consolidation plan considered student enrollment and demographic trends in the community, building utilization rates, building condition and modernization status and the availability of receiving schools to offer students an improved education experience.

Once the plan is in place, the average school enrollment will increase to 432 students, up from 376, the building utilization rate will be 84 percent, up from 72 percent and more than 1,000 additional students will have the opportunity to attend school in a modernized building.

For more information on the plan and the upcoming hearings, visit the DC Public Schools website.

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by Borderstan.com October 12, 2012 at 11:00 am 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

"LCCA"

The next LCCA meeting is Saturday, October 13 at Garrison Elementary School. (Luis Gomez Photos)

In response to busy work-week and family schedules, the Logan Circle Community Association (LCCA) created “Saturdays in Logan Circle,” where where the organization updates participants on community events, programs and other local items that are covered at LCCA’s Wednesday night meetings.

The next Saturday in Logan Circle meeting is tomorrow, October 13 at 10 am at Garrison Elementary School (1200 S Street NW). Jack Jacobson (unopposed Ward 2 candidate for the State Education Board) will speak, and meeting attendees will have the opportunity to engage in a discussion with principals from the schools in the Greater Logan Circle area.

Children are welcome and babysitters will be provided. LCCA will also provide coffee and light breakfast fare, as well as snacks for the kids.

For more information on the upcoming meeting, and to RSVP, please email jim.sullivan[AT]logancircle.org.

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by Borderstan.com September 21, 2012 at 8:00 am 1,020 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

"Ross School"

Ross Elementary School. (Luis Gomez Photos)

Ross Elementary School (1730 R Street NW) is hosting an Open House tomorrow, Saturday, September 22, for prospective parents of elementary school-aged children and community members interested in learning more about the local public school.

The event will run from 10 until noon, and will include a tour of the school with parents of current students and a meet-and-greet with teachers. There is no need to pre-register; if you have any specific questions prior to the event, contact Claudia Grinius ([email protected]) or Megan Lacchini Smith ([email protected]).

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by Borderstan.com September 20, 2012 at 8:00 am 1,011 0

"Jack Evans"

Ward 2 Councilmember Jack Evans. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

At Wednesday’s City Council meeting, Ward 2 Councilmember Jack Evans introduced three pieces of legislation affecting education and the arts, contracting and taxation in the District. The Dupont-Logan area is part of Ward 2.

Education and the Arts

The “Public School Librarians, Art and Music Teacher Act of 2012” requires each DC public school to have a full-time librarian, art teacher and music teacher.

According to a recently published article in The Huffington Post, DC Public Schools announced last May that it was cutting allocated funding for librarians at schools with less than 300 students. As a result, 58 of 124 DC schools started the 2012 school year without librarians.

“It’s hard for me to believe that we continue to invest nearly $2 billion a year into our public schools, with the highest per-pupil funding formula in the nation, and yet have one of the worst educational outcomes in the nation,” said Evans in a press release statement. “This suggests to me that our money is not being spent in the right places.”

Contracting

The “Council Contract Review Repeal Act of 2012” limits the way the Council is able to intervene in the contracting process. With this piece of legislation, Evans hopes to eliminate ethical violations that occur with vendor selection by ensuring that contracting is merit-based.

Commuter Tax

Evans also introduced a Sense of the Council Resolution related to the possibility of a commuter tax. This piece of legislation would apply taxes to Virginia and Maryland residents who frequently travel into the District for work.

“Many Virginia and Maryland residents take advantage of the infrastructure and business opportunities offered within the District every day, and yet don’t contribute to its upkeep through their income tax dollars,” said Evans. According to a press release issued by Evans’ office, Evans is believed to have Republican support on the commuter tax proposal.

For more information on these pieces of legislation, visit www.jackevans.org or contact Evans’ office at (202) 724-8058.

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by Borderstan.com September 17, 2012 at 2:00 pm 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

Whole Foods

The P Street Whole Foods Market. (Luis Gomez Photos)

Save up those shopping lists and support your community’s public school. On Tuesday, September 18, Garrison Elementary and three other schools in DC’s public school system will receive a share of 5% of the day’s net sales at the Whole Foods Market on P Street NW.

That same day, Garrison Elementary’s fourth-and-fifth-grade classes will spend the morning at Whole Foods to learn about organic food and healthy eating. Throughout the field trip, the students will get a tour of the store, compete in an organic scavenger hunt and take part in an “interview” with Whole Foods staff members.

The Whole Foods Market on P Street is open from 8 am until 10:30 pm at 1440 P Street NW.

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by Borderstan.com August 31, 2012 at 8:00 am 1,219 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

"Blue Moon Local 16" "Shaw Middle School"

Sample Blue Moon’s latest brew at Local 16 this Friday and help support the arts programs at Shaw Middle School.

On Friday, August 31, join neighbors at Local 16 (1602 U Street NW) to sample Blue Moon’s new brew, Caramel Apple Spiced Ale. And the best part? Proceeds will benefit arts programs at Shaw Middle School at 10th and U Streets NW.

Due to drastic budget cuts, many of the arts programs schools once had are now gone, and friends of Shaw Middle School are working to bring them back. The event runs from 6 until 9 pm; there is a $5 suggested donation.

What is a “Blue Moon,” you ask? It’s the second appearance of a full month in a calendar month — and tomorrow night is the last Blue Moon until 2015.

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by Borderstan.com August 23, 2012 at 12:00 pm 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

"Weekend"

Jack Jacobson will host a beauty night at Salon Rouge and a happy hour at Stoney’s on Friday, August 24. (Luis Gomez Photos)

This weekend is all about beautifying yourself and DC’s public schools, while getting to know local politicians and community members.

On Saturday, August 25, get involved in your community and help to make the first day of school the best it can be for local students! From 8 am until 1 pm, volunteers from across the DC metro area will help spruce up the city’s schools by participating in DCPS’s Annual Beautification Day. Sign-up as an individual or a group by calling (202) 724-4881 or via email at [email protected].

Actually, on Friday, August 24, start your weekend off right with a blowout, drinks and appetizers at Salon Rouge (636 17th Street NW). Ladies are invited to the event (from 7:30 until 10 pm) with a $25 contribution to Jack Jacobson for DC. Meanwhile, the gentlemen are invited to a community happy hour at Stoney’s (1433 P Street NW) from 5 until 8 pm.

Have kids? Don’t worry. RSVPs will be notified in advance of two local homes in the Dupont/Logan Circle areas with experienced sitters, courtesy of Jack Jacobson for DC.

More information on the evening’s events is available on the Facebook page. Those needing complimentary sitters please RSVP with an email to [email protected].

Jack Jacobson is currently the Dupont Circle Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner for ANC 2B-04, and is running for State Board of Education for Ward 2.

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by Borderstan.com August 22, 2012 at 8:00 am 1,087 0

Borderstan welcomes guest columns on variety of subjects with differing viewpoints; email us at borderstan[AT]gmail.com. 

From Jack Jacobson. He is an Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner in Dupont Circle (ANC 2B-04), and is a candidate for State Board of Education representative for Ward 2.

"Public Schools"

Jack Jacobson. (Luis Gomez Photos)

Early in our academic careers, all of us at some point became aware of the significance of the elusive 100% score on a test. To some that figure signified perfection, or simply that you knew all the answers to the test questions. However in hindsight, as with many experiences from childhood, the reality is not that simple.

Earlier this year, Mayor Vincent Gray and Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson unveiled “A Capital Commitment,” a five-year plan to right the District of Columbia’s faltering public schools. While it is vital to lay out a clear vision for increasing student achievement and successfully implement a strategic plan, “A Capital Commitment” — as it is written — would continue to allow an unacceptable number of students to fail. Moreover, it leaves a great deal of uncertainty for current students entering traditional public middle and high schools in the District.

The Goal of an Education System

Education cannot simply be about the test scores, far from it. Everyone learns at his or her own pace and in his or her own way. To attempt a cookie cutter solution to DC’s education system is neither practical nor sound. That being said, the goal of any education system should be 100% proficiency system-wide. But how do you get there? I’ll leave that to those best suited to the task: the teachers and administrators of our public schools who deal with each child on a daily basis.

The five-year goals of “A Capital Commitment” are straightforward:

  1. Improve achievement rates: At least 70% of students will be proficient in reading and math, and the number of advanced students in the District will double.
  2. Invest in struggling schools: The 40 lowest-performing schools will increase proficiency rates by 40%.
  3. Increase the graduation rate: At least 75% of entering 9th graders will graduate in four years.
  4. Improve satisfaction: 90% of students will like their school.
  5. Increase enrollment: DCPS will increase enrollment over five years.

The Mayor and Chancellor have been aggressively touting their plan, with the Mayor speaking extensively to it during his budget roundtables held across the city this year. The Chancellor has been hosting a series of “The State of Schools” presentations and listening sessions in every Ward. I attended the “State of Ward 2 Schools” event on June 27, which was well attended by DCPS and Ward 2 school administration officials. Unfortunately it was poorly attended by parents and community members. (It should be noted that the original “State of Ward 2 Schools” meeting was scheduled for June 6 — before the end of school — but was cancelled at the last minute following then-Council Chairman Kwame Brown’s resignation earlier that day. The meeting was rescheduled twice before settling on the June 27 date, after the school year had ended).

The Chancellor’s presentation began with a thorough overview of the campaign, highlighting its goals and objectives, then led into a Q&A session with attendees. Chancellor Henderson discussed at great length the anticipated increases in proficiency and student achievement that the plan would accomplish at the end of five years.

However, during the entire discussion and Q&A, there was no mention of 100% proficiency, a 100% graduation rate, or 100% of students liking their schools. This is in stark contrast to the expectations of parents and guardians. From their perspective, all students deserve the opportunity to achieve 100% of their potential. To compete locally, regionally and globally we must do a better job of educating our children. For years jobs have been leaving the region and the country. Cheaper labor is often cited as the cause, but just as often the need for technical proficiency in mathematics and the sciences is touted as a reason. As the nation’s capital, with the resources and intellectual capacity at our disposal, we should set the bar higher. The issues plaguing the school system are significant, but academically we must aspire to be the best. Frankly, when DCPS students complete their academic careers and enter the workforce, their employers will expect nothing short of their best.

The Lowest Performing Schools

“A Capital Commitment” has a five-year goal of transforming its 40 lowest-performing schools to achieve an average 63% proficiency in reading and 62% proficiency in math. A 63% proficiency in reading would equate to 37% of graduates not being able to fully comprehend this article, an abysmal statistic for students who are a product of the public schools in our nation’s capital.

To help achieve proficiency goals, Chancellor Henderson this spring announced a $10 million “Proving What’s Possible” grant program to improve student outcomes. All DCPS schools could compete, but it was largely assumed that the grants would go where there was the most need to increase student achievement. The June 14 press release from DCPS announcing the recipients of the awards trumpeted, “Funds to spur innovation, improve learning in 40 lowest-performing schools.”

But the funding didn’t go to those 40 schools, at least not exclusively. In total, 59 of 125 DCPS schools (47%) received grants, including Benjamin Banneker High School and Hyde-Addison Elementary School, both top-rated schools by GreatSchools.org. (According to DCPS, approximately 85% of the “Proving What’s Possible” grants went to the lowest-performing schools.)

Another goal of “A Capital Commitment” is to achieve a traditional public school system-wide proficiency rate of 70% in reading and math. That means that at the outset, 30% of our students will not achieve the same proficiency as their peers. Washington will never be a “world class” city if our graduates cannot be competitive in the global workforce.

It is better to set the bar high and fall short than to set it too low and lose another generation of students to mediocrity or worse. Keep in mind the DCPS had 43,866 students in the system in the 2009-2010 academic year, according to the US Census Bureau, far fewer than cities like New York and Chicago. However, we spend $18,677 per student per year versus $18,618 in New York and $13,078 in Chicago (the national average is $10,615). We are smaller system, spend more money, but are not achieving better results.

Middle and High Schools and the Pre-School Boom

The ward-by-ward DCPS presentations failed to address the continued uncertainty for rising middle and high school students under “A Capital Commitment.” Five years ago, when then-Chancellor Michelle Rhee asked young parents to stay in the District and believe in the reforms being implemented, they stayed and sent their children to our traditional public schools. Unfortunately, school reform has not yet significantly improved our middle and high schools across the city. The reality is that most of the parents of these rising fourth and fifth graders have no viable traditional public school options.

The high-achieving schools within DCPS are over enrolled and thus not viable options for the majority of students. In contrast, our under-achieving and failing schools have been left, seemingly, to fend for themselves as elementary school students continue to exit traditional public schools to attend private middle and high schools and the growing number of public charter schools across the District. Without a specific plan for improving our traditional public middle and high schools, the goal of increasing DCPS student enrollment will never be achieved.

Keep in mind the difficult economy and other factors that have led to a larger number of families staying in the District. However, this has resulted in a steep rise in preschool and pre-kindergarten enrollment. Overall, DCPS has placed a great deal of attention on the elementary school system, but our middle and high schools must be ready academically to meet the impending student population boom. And that boom is coming much sooner than the five years “A Capital Commitment” promises.

Otherwise, instead of the traditional flight to the suburbs for better schools, you’ll see a flight from ward to ward. The end result is only those that can afford to rent or buy in “better” neighborhoods will get access to high-achieving schools. This cannot be allowed to happen in any city, much less Washington, DC.

Start the Conversation

“A Capital Commitment” is an admirable plan at the end of the day – it sets reasonable, achievable goals and will benefit a significant segment of our students who are falling further and further behind their peers nationally. However, there is a difference between developing a plan and successfully executing it.

It is imperative that Chancellor Henderson and Mayor Gray continue to conduct a full, comprehensive and sustained public education and involvement campaign to engage parents, teachers, administrators, and the broader business, non-profit and residential communities in supporting our schools and improving student outcomes.

“A Capital Commitment” should be the beginning of a conversation for goal setting and what’s possible for student achievement, not the endgame. DCPS schools have produced amazing leaders like Duke Ellington and Warren Buffett. Washington’s children are as bright and have as much potential as any children in the country. Our public education system should acknowledge this and provide them every opportunity to reach that potential and excel – and all Washingtonians will be better off for it.

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by Borderstan.com August 7, 2012 at 8:00 am 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

"Ross School"

Ross Elementary School renovations are almost complete. (Luis Gomez Photos)

As summer winds down, signs reminding us that the kids will soon be back in school soon are everywhere (not just in those annoying Target commercials).

This year, the students (and faculty) at Ross Elementary School have more to look forward to than a new pair of jeans and some fresh notebooks. Over the summer, construction crews have been working hard to renovate the R Street NW public school.

Inside, old doorways were demolished, AC window units were removed and floors were ripped up and refinished. The school received new classroom ceiling grids, plumbing fixtures, water fountains and classroom sinks, and crews replaced data lines, electrical switchgear equipment, outlets and light fixtures throughout the building.

The exterior of the school also received some TLC with a new HVAC system (a total of seven outdoor units) and an upgraded conduit for cables.

Construction at Ross Elementary is expected to take roughly three more weeks, and Principal Searl and her staff are scheduled to move back into the facility the week of August 20.

So pack those backpacks, kids! And enjoy your new school!

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by Borderstan.com July 12, 2012 at 3:00 pm 0

Ward 1: If you live along the U Street corridor, you probably live in Ward 1. (DC City Council)

DC Public Schools is hosting a Ward 1 State of the Schools meeting on July 17 to discuss improvements in education. (Borderstan)

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com

DC Public Schools (DCPS) is hosting a meeting on Tuesday, July 17 for parents and community members to meet with the city’s education leaders and discuss progress and areas of growth for Ward 1 schools.

DCPS Chancellor Kaya Henderson and Ward 1 Councilmember Jim Graham, will host the meeting; local principals will also be on hand to meet with participants.

The meeting will take place at Columbia Heights Educational Campus at 3101 16th Street NW from 5 to 8 pm. Childcare and refreshments will be provided.

For additional information on the meeting, please visit the State of the Schools webpage or contact Jennifer Skates at jennifer.skates[AT]dc.gov at the DCPS Office of Family and Public Engagement.

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by Borderstan.com July 1, 2012 at 11:30 pm 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com

News from Dupont-Logan-U Street

On Monday, July 2, DC Government offices will be open, but DC Public Schools will remain closed as DC continues to respond to power outages that resulted from Friday night’s severe weatheras well as the extreme heat that has followed. Students and staff assigned to summer school should not report.

The Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) announced that all OSSE school bus service is suspended tomorrow – including transportation of children enrolled in non-public placements and in other jurisdictions. Fr more information, visit the DC Homeland Security department website and the DC Government website.

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by Borderstan.com June 21, 2012 at 8:00 am 1,158 0

"Ross School"

Improvements in Ward 2 schools and the city’s education system are the focus of the June 27 meeting. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com

After its second cancellation, the Ward 2 Sate of the Schools meeting is now rescheduled for Wednesday, June 27 at 5 pm.

Ward 2 Councilmember Jack Evans, and DC Public Schools (DCPS) Chancellor, Kaya Henderson, will host the meeting for parents and community to discuss future improvements in Ward 2 schools and its education system.

The meeting will be held at Francis Stevens Education Campus, 2425 N Street NW. A meet and greet with area principals starts at 5 pm; the meeting with Jack Evans and Kaya Henderson begins at 5:45 pm.

Meeting attendees will be able to contribute ideas and suggestions for school improvements, particularly in regards to improving elementary and middle schools, as well as the feeder program in all school levels. Central office employees and school leaders will also be on-hand to answer questions and to meet with those in attendance.

For additional information on the meeting, please visit the State of the Schools webpage or contact Jennifer Skates at jennifer.skates[AT]dc.gov at the DCPS Office of Family and Public Engagement.

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by Borderstan.com June 16, 2012 at 3:01 pm 1,718 2 Comments

From Matt Rhoades. Email him at matty[AT]borderstan.com.

In a change of plans, Mary Lord announced Friday that she will run for an At-Large seat to the DC State Board of Education, instead of seeking re-election for the Ward 2 seat on the Board. The DC Board of Elections reported this week that Marvin Tucker also picked up petitions for the At-Large Education Board seat. Both Lord and Tucker picked up nominating petitions Friday, according to the DC Board of Elections.

In his June 10 fundraising report to the DC Office of Campaign Finance, Jack Jacobson reported raising $18,216 for his race to win the Ward 2 DC State Board of Education seat. Lord’s decision leaves Jack Jacobson as the only announced candidate for the Ward 2 Education Board seat.

"Borderstan""Jack Jacobson"

Jack Jacobson. (Luis Gomez Photos)

As Washington Post political columnist Mike DeBonis noted Wednesday about Jacobon’s fundraising, he “has built quite the war chest in his nonpartisan bid to unseat State Board of Education member Mary Lord. His $18,216 on hand is particularly impressive considering SBOE races have a $200 donation limit.”

Jacobson represents District 4 on Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2B, which covers the Dupont Circle area.

In his Friday statement, Jacobson said the following about Lord: “An inaugural member of the board, Mary has been a valuable asset to me in my capacity as an Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner in Dupont Circle (2B04). Her passion for a top-quality education for all District of Columbia students is undeniable. The possibility of two sitting board members, well versed with the issues facing Ward 2 schools, makes me hopeful that significant improvements across the entire school system are within reach. I welcome the opportunity to work with Mary in the near future.”

DC school board elections are non-partisan — candidates do not run in the primaries on April 3 for party nominations. School board seats are filled in the general election on November 6.

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by Borderstan.com June 4, 2012 at 8:00 am 1,347 1 Comment

"Ross School"

Improvements in Ward 2 schools and the DC school system will be discussed at Wednesday's forum. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com

Ward 2 Councilmember, Jack Evans, and DC Public Schools (DCPS) Chancellor, Kaya Henderson, will host a meeting for parents and community members on Wednesday, June 6 to discuss future improvements in Ward 2 schools and its education system.

The meeting will be held at Francis Stevens Education Campus, 2425 N Street NW. A meet and greet with area principals starts at 5 pm; the meeting with Jack Evans and Kaya Henderson begins at 5:45 pm.

Meeting attendees will have the opportunity to contribute ideas and suggestions for school improvements, particularly in regards to improving elementary and middle schools, as well as the feeder program in all school levels. Central office employees and school leaders will also be on-hand to answer questions and to meet with those in attendance.

For additional information on the meeting, please visit the State of the Schools webpage or contact Jennifer Skates at jennifer.skates[AT]dc.gov at the DCPS Office of Family and Public Engagement.

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by Borderstan.com May 11, 2012 at 9:30 am 1,456 1 Comment

The Logan Circle Community Association(LCCA) is sponsoring an education event tomorrow, Saturday, May 12, at 10 am. In the upstairs space at Stoney’s (1433 P Street NW), a  panel will discuss education issues from a local perspective. There will also be a short LCCA update.

"Borderstan""P Street NW" "Stoney's"

Stoney's is at 1433 P Street NW. (Luis Gomez Photos)

The panel will consist of parents from local DC Public Schools (Garrison, Marie Reed, Ross, Cleveland ES and others). They will discuss issues including entering your child in your in-boundary school as well as pre-school, pre-K and 1st Grade expectations. There will be plenty of time for questions from attendees.

“We plan to hold these Saturday meeting once a month — this is our third such meeting,” said Jim Sullivan of LCCA.  It is called ‘Saturday Morning in Logan Circle.’  The purpose to introduce younger or new community members to the LCCA — parents, young professionals, etc. In addition to education-related issues, we plan on discussing current LCCA-related events that are also discussed at our LCAA monthly meetings on Wednesdays,” said Sullivan.

About LCCA

LCCA was established in 1972. It represents the Greater Logan Circle area, bounded by S Street to the north, K Street to the south, 9th Street to the east and 16th Street to the west. Membership is open to anyone who resides or owns a business or property within its boundaries. The organization holds monthly meetings and and isinvolved with a number of neighborhood-related issues. For more information, contact LCCA President Tim Christensen at tim.christensen[AT]logancircle.org.

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