by Borderstan.com November 29, 2012 at 4:00 pm 0

"Theaters"

Borderstan Theaters. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Luis Gomez. Catch his photos at One Photograph A Day. Follow him on Twitter @LuisGomezPhotos.

Check the listings below for full details on performances at six neighborhood theaters.

Howard Theatre, 620 T Street NW

Keegan Theatre at Church Street, 1742 Church Street NW

  • All My Sons closes December 1: “Joe Keller and Herbert Deever, partners in a machine shop during the war, turned out defective airplane parts, causing the deaths of many men. Deever was sent to prison while Keller escaped punishment and went on to make a lot of money. In a work of tremendous power, a love affair between Keller’s son, Chris, and Ann Deever, Herbert’s daughter, the bitterness of George Keller, who returns from the war to find his father in prison and his father’s partner free, and the reaction of a son to his father’s guilt escalate toward a climax of electrifying intensity.” (Keegan Theatre)
  • An Irish Carol opens December 14 and runs through December 31: “A Keegan holiday tradition, AN IRISH CAROL by Dublin native Matthew Keenan, premiered in 2011 to sold out houses and rave reviews. An an homage to Dickens’ classic, AN IRISH CAROL follows one evening in the life of David, a wealthy pub owner who has distanced himself from others and lost touch with his own humanity. But on this Christmas Eve — challenged by a voice from the past, provoked by those in this present, and faced with the reality of lonely future – David’s life may change forever. AN IRISH CAROL is a modern fable, told with the biting humor and incisive candor of its Irish playwright.”

Lincoln Theatre at 1215 U Street NW

Source at 1835 14th Street NW

  • Check the website for upcoming events.

Studio Theatre at 1501 14th Street NW

  • The Aliens opened November 14. “An artful and indelible drama about two young, affable slackers behind a Vermont coffee shop and the teenager they take under their wing.” (Studio Theater)
  • An Iliad, opens December 21, “First sung around a campfire 2,800 years ago, The Iliad remains a soaring ode about humanity’s seemingly timeless attraction to violence and destruction. In this theatrical telling, a storyteller grapples with the mythology, brutality, and humanity of Homer’s epic poem. An intimate and immediate look at rage, grief, and the heroism and horror of a seemingly endless war.” (Studio Theater)

Theater J at 1529 16th Street NW

  • Woodie Sez: The Life & Music of Woodie Guthrie closes December 2: “Celebrate the 100th birthday of Woody Guthrie, the creator of American classics like ‘This Land is Your Land’ and ‘The Ballad of Tom Joad!’  This boisterous retelling of the life of America’s troubadour blends musical numbers, scenes from Guthrie’s life and excerpts from his progressive newspaper column. The infectious and moving piece brings to life a true American hero, who proudly declared he would ‘always be there whenever working folks fight for their rights.'” (Theater J)

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by Borderstan.com November 15, 2012 at 3:00 pm 1 Comment

"Borderstan""Theaters"

Borderstan Theaters. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Luis Gomez. Catch his photos at One Photograph A Day. Follow him on Twitter @LuisGomezPhotos.

Check the listings below for full details on performances at six neighborhood theaters.

Howard Theatre, 620 T Street NW

Keegan Theatre at Church Street, 1742 Church Street NW

  • All My Sons opened November 3 and runs through December 1: “Joe Keller and Herbert Deever, partners in a machine shop during the war, turned out defective airplane parts, causing the deaths of many men. Deever was sent to prison while Keller escaped punishment and went on to make a lot of money. In a work of tremendous power, a love affair between Keller’s son, Chris, and Ann Deever, Herbert’s daughter, the bitterness of George Keller, who returns from the war to find his father in prison and his father’s partner free, and the reaction of a son to his father’s guilt escalate toward a climax of electrifying intensity.” (Keegan Theatre)

Lincoln Theatre at 1215 U Street NW

Source at 1835 14th Street NW

  • Check the website for upcoming events.

Studio Theatre at 1501 14th Street NW

  • The Aliens opened November 14. “An artful and indelible drama about two young, affable slackers behind a Vermont coffee shop and the teenager they take under their wing.” (Studio Theater)

Theater J at 1529 16th Street NW

  • Woodie Sez: The Life & Music of Woodie Guthrie runs through December 2: “Celebrate the 100th birthday of Woody Guthrie, the creator of American classics like “This Land is Your Land” and “The Ballad of Tom Joad!”  This boisterous retelling of the life of America’s troubadour blends musical numbers, scenes from Guthrie’s life and excerpts from his progressive newspaper column. The infectious and moving piece brings to life a true American hero, who proudly declared he would “always be there whenever working folks fight for their rights.”” (Theater J)

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by Borderstan.com August 20, 2012 at 8:00 am 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

"Divas at Howard Theater"

A Drag Salute to the DIVAS comes to the Howard this Tuesday, August 21. (Luis Gomez Photos)

On Tuesday, August 21, Tina Turner, Cher, Patti LaBelle, Beyonce, Diana Ross, Erykah Badu and Whitney Houston will grace the stage of the Howard Theatre — or at least their impersonators will.

That’s right, the world’s most famous divas will be replicated by some of DC’s top “illusionists” during the show, “Salute to the Divas.” DC’s own Shi-Queeta-Lee will direct and act in the first female impersonation show at the Howard since the 1960’s.

Doors open at 6 pm and the show starts at 8 pm. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door and can be purchased online. For more information, visit the Howard Theatre’s website.

You might just swear they are the real thing!

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by Borderstan.com July 30, 2012 at 10:00 am 1,001 1 Comment

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com. 

"Lincoln Theatre"

Lincoln Theatre. (Luis Gomez Photos)

On Friday afternoon, Mayor Gray announced that the city is seeking a new operator for the Lincoln Theatre on U Street NW.

The current operator of the Lincoln is the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, which took over in January after the city ended its contract with the U Street Theatre Foundation. Currently, the theatre remains dark most nights of the week.

According to an article in the Washington City Paper, a request for proposals (RFP) for a new operator is expected to go out in the next 30 days.

Over the years, the historic U Street theatre has struggled to maintain management and generate revenue, which has fueled rumors of the landmark being for sale.

Lionell Thomas, director of the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities, hopes to bring-in someone with a “creative concept” to revitalize the theatre and run it as a mixed-use space, reports City Paper.

Stay tuned to Borderstan.com for more information on the Lincoln Theatre and its search for a new operator.

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by Borderstan.com February 1, 2012 at 2:30 pm 0

"Borderstan""The Two Gentlemen of Verona", DC Shakespeare Theatre Company

Andrew Veenstra as Valentine and Natalie Mitchell as Silvia in the Shakespeare Theatre Company’s production of The Two Gentlemen of Verona, directed by PJ Paparelli. (Photo by Scott Suchman)

From Kate Hays. Follow her on Twitter @kateyhays and email her at [email protected].

No one does teen rom-com dramady quite like Shakespeare. Even modern(ish) movies like 10 Things I Hate About You or She’s the Man try to recreate and capture the comedy, angst, passion and, yes, drama, of Shakespeare’s plays about young obsessive love.

So what better way to show this than: to lace Shakespeare with some boozing, deliver scene change narration through text message banner above the stage, self-mutilate via cutting, display dramatic threats of suicide, and use karaoke between two people who pretend  (unconvincingly) not to be in love?  Shakespeare Theatre Company’s most recent opening, Two Gentlemen of Verona, does all of this and more.

One of Shakespeare’s earliest and lesser-known plays, “Two Gentlemen” has the stuff of a true teen drama. Two friends argue about love; one (Proteus) is madly in love, the other (Valentine) swears he’ll never love. Spoiler alert: Valentine is wrong! But things really get crazy when Proteus forgets about his love (Julia), and decides that the only chick for him is Silvia, the girl Valentine loves.

And if teen dramady isn’t for you, how about rock opera? The play is peppered with rock tunes that keep the play moving along. You won’t even need to consult your synopsis to know what’s going on with this installment from the Bard!

Want the rest of the story? Two Gentlemen of Verona is at the Lansburgh Theatre now through March 4. Go to Shakespeare Theatre Company for tickets and show times.

by Borderstan.com December 12, 2011 at 1:30 pm 0

City Artistic Partnerships, Fort Fringe, The Santaland Diaries"

The Santaland Diaries” runs through December 24 at Fort Fringe, 607 New York Avenue NW. (Courtesy City Artistic Partnerships)

From Kate Hays. Follow her on Twitter @kateyhays and email her at [email protected].

What’s worse than resorting to seasonal work as a holiday elf at Macy’s?

“… the very real possibility that I won’t get hired.”

So begins the one-man show, The Santaland Diaries, an adaptation of the offbeat, unrepentant, and, yes, snarky tale of David Sedaris‘ season as one of Santa’s helper elves.

If you’re not familiar with Sedaris, he’s a master of observing his surroundings and interactions. It’s his outrageous take on both the oddities and the regular happenings of life that make his writing so freaking funny.

Joe Brack plays Sedaris as a Macy’s elf. He does an excellent job of channeling Sedaris’ humor (if this stuff is funny written, imagine it animated with expressions and voices), while still making the story his own little piece of Christmas hell.

While The Santaland Diaries is practically a holiday tradition — Director Matty Griffths and Brack have collaborated on the production for three out of the last four years — I’d encourage you to see it this year.  Santaland’s got what you really need: a good laugh.

The Santaland Diaries runs at Fort Fringe, 607 New York Avenue NW, through December 24. Go to City Artistic Partnerships for show times and tickets.

by Borderstan.com December 9, 2011 at 11:00 am 0

"Borderstan""Keegan" An Irish Carol

“An Irish Carol” runs through December 31 at the Keegan Theatre at Church Street. (Courtesy Keegan Theatre).

From Luis Gomez. Catch his photos on Picplz and at One Photograph A Day. Follow him on Twitter @LuisGomezPhotos.

Nothing to do this weekend? All your holiday party invites got stuck in your spam filter? The dog ate them after you brought the mail into the house? Take in a show at a local theater before last-minute Christmas shopping or heading out of town.

Another option: The Santaland Diaries runs at Fort Fringe, 607 New York Avenue NW, through December 24. Go to City Artistic Partnerships for show times and tickets. Look for Kate Hays’ review on Monday.

If you are in the mood for a holiday-related theme the Washington Improv Theater’s Seasonal Disaster runs through December 31 at the Source: “We’re putting together a hot mess of improv comedy just in time for the holidays. We know it’ll be improvised and will NOT exploit an injured orphan to invoke the spirit of holitimes charity and togetherness. Cuz that’s wrong.” (Source)

At the Lincoln, you can catch the Holiday Comedy Jam on Saturday, December 10.

Closing: This is your final chance to see The Golden Dragon at Studio Theatre; it closes this Sunday, December 11.

Full details below.

Keegan Theatre at Church Street at 1742 Church Street NW

  • An Irish Carol runs through December 31. “Set in a Dublin pub, this world premiere by Matthew Keenan is a homage to Dickens’ classic — told as only the Irish can. An Irish Carol follows one evening in the life of David, a wealthy pub owner who has distanced himself from others and lost touch with his own humanity in the interest of self protection and material success. But on this Christmas Eve — challenged by a voice from the past, provoked by those in this present, and faced with the reality of lonely future – David’s life may change forever.  An Irish Carol is a modern fable, told with the biting humor and incisive candor of its Irish playwright – a new holiday tradition for Keegan audiences.” (Keegan Theatre)

Lincoln Theatre at 1215 U Street NW

Source at 1835 14th Street NW

  • Seasonal Disaster runs through December 31. From the Washington Improv Theater: “We’re putting together a hot mess of improv comedy just in time for the holidays. We know it’ll be improvised and will NOT exploit an injured orphan to invoke the spirit of holitimes charity and togetherness. Cuz that’s wrong. Also: No dancing mice. Cuz that’s scary… and sort of gross.” (Source) Check back for times.
  • Every Tuesday night at the Source is Harold Night! with the Washington Improv Theater. Overview: “Each week is a demonstration, celebration and experiment in the world-famous improv longform, Harold. It starts with an audience suggestion and explores whatever themes emerge through a series of scenes. All of the action is brought to life by WIT’s own Harold Teams right before your eyes.” (WIT)

Studio Theatre at 1501 14th Street NW

  • The Golden Dragon closes Sunday, December 11. “A kaleidoscopic look at a globalized world, this play by one of Germany’s most innovative and adventurous writers unfolds in brief and fierce comic scenes. Five actors cross age, race, and gender to play fifteen characters in this vicious, poetic, and surprisingly moving investigation of how intertwined our lives really are.” (Studio Theatre)
  • Bust runs through December 18. “With one foot in Hollywood and the other in jail, the former Daily Show correspondent careens wildly between the two worlds, taking us on a hilarious, poignant, and completely unforgettable ride.” (Studio Theatre)

Theater J at 1529 16th Street NW

  • The Kinsey Sicks in Oy Vey in a Manger, December 24-26. “America’s favorite Dragapella Beauty-Shop Quartet brings its irreverent humor and harmonies back to DC just in time for the holidays. With gut-busting parodies and raucous schtick, The Kinsey Sicks offers wholesome favorites like “I Had a Little Facial,” “Harried Little Christmas,” and “‘Tis the Season to Drink Stoli”! (Theater J)
  • The Religion Thing runs January 4-29: “”Mo and Brian are a picture-perfect DC couple: they’re smart, they’re witty, and they have a beautifully remodeled kitchen. But when Mo’s best friend Patti announces she’s found Jesus and is putting her own career on hold, Mo must take a closer look at the harder truths surrounding her own marriage. A brand new comedy about relationships, faith and the fine line between compromise and regret.” (Theater J)

by Borderstan.com November 25, 2011 at 8:00 am 0

Joan Hisaoka Gallery, U Street NW, Luis Gomez Photos, Borderstan, Kate Hays

Joan Hisaoka Healing Arts Gallery on U Street NW: Neighborhood galleries and theaters are very welcoming, even if you don’t know a great deal about the arts. You just have to step inside. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Kate Hays. Follow her on Twitter @kateyhays and email her at [email protected]

Kate Hays

Kate Hays writes about the arts for Borderstan.

A few months ago, I was commiserating with a friend (okay, Borderstan contributor Alejandra Owens) about blogging; the sorts of articles that are easy to write, and those that are hard. And how sometimes what seems like the easiest piece (say, a first-person one like this) is harder than a profile of someone else.

In the course of our chat, it came up that, long ago, I covered art galleries for a big newspaper’s online content. Once Al figured that out, she asked if I’d be interested in covering art and theater for Borderstan. I was excited but a little intimidated; it had been a long time since I’d been anything more than a consumer of art and theater.

The art and theater in our neighborhood are totally in reach and ready for your eyes, even if your last shot at art appreciation was in kindergarten finger painting. I think you’ll find the theaters and galleries welcoming and excited to see you.

And then I thought about what I love about Borderstan: it’s a blog that seeks to bring to light the best of what’s happening in our neighborhood — ideas, people, food, and yes, art and theater. I thought about how much I love this neighborhood and how Borderstan has given me even more ways to appreciate it.

So I got excited about writing for Borderstan not because I was eager to pull out my inner art critic, but my inner art appreciator. And that’s what I’m hoping to extend to you in what I write — a glimpse at why the art and theater in our neighborhood is totally in reach and ready for your eyes, even if your last shot at art appreciation was in kindergarten finger painting.

I hope that when you read what I write about plays and openings, you’ll look beyond the windows of our galleries and theaters, and step inside. I think you’ll find the theaters and galleries welcoming and excited to see you.

Take a look, and let us know what you like and what you wish you’d skipped. I’ll do the same.

Posts by Kate Hays

by Borderstan.com October 31, 2011 at 11:00 am 1,179 0

"Borderstan""Keegan Theatre""The Crucible", Cameron Whitman Photography

“The Crucible” at The Keegan Theatre at Church Street through November 19. (Cameron Whitman Photography)

From Kate Hays. Follow her on Twitter @kateyhays and email her at [email protected]

Nothing feels more unjust than a wrongful accusation. And there’s nothing worse than seeing someone pay for something they haven’t done.

At The Keegan Theatre right now, you can have a front row seat to squirm through just that sort of thing. In The Crucible, love-struck troublemaker Abigail Williams is out to win her man (John Proctor), whatever it takes. One little problem; John is married, and is trying to patch things up with his wife, the pure and righteous Elizabeth.

Add Tituba, a maid from Barbados with a penchant for voodoo; Reverend Parris, Abigail’s holier-than-thou preacher uncle who wants to know what his daughter and niece were doing dancing (naked?!) in the forest; some finger pointing; and the setting — Massachusetts, 1692 — and you’ve got the makings of a true nail-biter.

The Crucible is not an easy play, and the Keegan cast does a lovely job; notable standouts were the stalwart Giles Corey (played by Timothy Hayes Lynch), the edgy and nervy Mary Warren (Emily Riehl-Bedford), the powerful and misguided Deputy Governor Danforth (Kevin Adams) and the love-to-hate-him then hate-to-love-him Reverend John Hale (Kevin Hasser), as well as the group of accusing girls in the second act.

And in spite of the tense subject matter, the cast even elicited giggles from the audience. Maybe this sort of thing — absurd accusations, too unbelievable to be true — is funny at the start. But by the second act, the impulse to intervene on behalf of the imperfect, but innocent characters is overwhelming.

It’s no accident that we as audience members feel the urge to jump up and yell, “STOP!” Arthur Miller wrote the Crucible in the late 1950s, in the McCarthy-era, as an allegory to the veritable anti-communist witch hunt; he, himself, was a target. But there’s just something about a witch hunt that always rings true, no? I found myself thinking about Troy Davis, recently put to death in Georgia for crimes he claimed he did not commit. We may never know if he did it or not, but it doesn’t feel good to wonder.

If you haven’t dropped by to see a show at Keegan, this would be a wonderful opportunity. Tucked in a residential block (on Church Street NW between 17th and 18th Streets NW), it’s a lovely theatre, and if witch hunts aren’t your thing, they’ve got a full season ahead.

The Crucible runs through November 19. Next up at Keegan is An Irish Carol, December 3 through 31. Check out their website for dates, tickets and the rest of the 2011-2012 season.

by Borderstan.com October 12, 2011 at 11:00 am 1,180 0

The Crucible, Keegan Theatre at Church Street, Cameron Whitman Photography

Opening October 22: Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible” will be at the Keegan Theatre at Church Street. (Cameron Whitman Photography)

The fall theater season ramps up this month at theaters in the Dupont-Logan area, with three new shows slated to open.

  • First up is Arms and the Man at the Source. A production of the Constellation Theatre Company, its opening date is Friday, October 21.
  • The following night, Saturday, October 22, you can catch opening night for The Crucible at the Keegan Theatre at Church Street.
  • At Theater J, After the Fall opens on Wednesday, October 26.

Details for these shows plus the Lincoln Theatre and the Studio Theatre are below.

Keegan Theatre at Church Street at 1742 Church Street NW

  • The Crucible opens Saturday, October 22, and runs through November 19. Overview: “Arthur Miller’s classic portrait of one man’s struggle toward grace is set in the scorching context of the 17th-Century Salem witch trials. A community galvanized by fear and suspicion, a wife betrayed by lust, an orphan girl blind with passion and possessed with revenge, ruthless prosecutors, deluded holy men and covetous neighbors.” (Keegan)

Lincoln Theatre at 1215 U Street NW

Source at 1835 14th Street NW

  • Arms and the Man opens Friday, October 21 and runs through November 20. Overview: The play is a comedy by George Bernard Shaw and a production of the Constellation Theatre Company: “A young lady fantasizes about the bravery of her heroic fiancé when the reality of war bursts into her bedroom in the form of a fugitive enemy soldier. Enjoy this witty comedy by famed playwright George Bernard Shaw and its revealing truths about romanticism, class and the idealization of war.” (Constellation)
  • Every Tuesday night at the Source is Harold Night! with the Washington Improv Theater. Overview: “Each week is a demonstration, celebration and experiment in the world-famous improv longform, Harold. It starts with an audience suggestion and explores whatever themes emerge through a series of scenes. All of the action is brought to life by WIT’s own Harold Teams right before your eyes.” (WIT)

Studio Theatre at 1501 14th Street NW

  • Lungs runs through Sunday, October 16. Overview: “A couple negotiates sex, parenthood, and responsibilities large and small in Duncan Macmillan’s intimate drama about chance, change, and consequence.” (Studio Theatre)
  • The Habit of Art runs through Sunday, October 23. Overview: “Wistful and filthily funny, the latest play from the award-winning writer of The History Boys examines creativity, desire, and the tenacity of the artistic spirit.” (Studio Theatre)

Theater J at 1529 16th Street NW

  • After the Fall opens Wednesday, October 26 and runs through November 27. Overview: “Arthur Miller’s most personal play explores one man’s quest to make peace with history; his own and the tumultuous world around him. In the wake of the tragic death of his famous second wife, Quentin desperately tries to move forward in his life. Yet he is compelled to relive his childhood losses, failed marriages and the controversial politics of the 1950’s Blacklist which turned allies against each other and leaves Quentin, in the end, as both noble hero and complicit bystander.” (Theater J)

by Borderstan.com September 29, 2011 at 8:00 am 1,517 3 Comments

"Borderstan" "1409 Play Bill" "14th Street NW"

1409 Playbill Cafe will close its doors at 1409 14th Street NW at the end of the week. Owners Elsayed Mansour and Jeffrey DeMontier are looking for a new location. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Tom Hay. Questions for Tom? Send him an email. You can follow him on Twitter @Tomonswann.

Logan Circle restaurant 1409 Playbill Cafe will close its doors at 1409 14th Street NW at the end of the week. The cafe and mini-theater has been drawing theater fans and industry players to the location since 1998.

Owners Elsayed Mansour and Jeffrey DeMontier opened long before the neighborhood was popular and took a big risk to settle there in the Pre-Whole Foods days. The Logan Circle store on P Street opened in December 2000 where an abandoned garage had stood. It was a catalyst for development on the 1400 block of P Street as well as adjacent blocks on 14th Street and Church Street NW.

The owners — who also happen to be 30-year residents of the neighborhood — hope to relocate to another space in the vicinity sometime soon. Borderstan spoke with Mansour about 1409 Playbill Cafe and Logan Circle.

Borderstan: Tell us about what your vision was for the cafe when you first opened?

Mansour: Both of us are theater lovers so we wanted to do something for that community. Studio Theatre, Woolly Mammoth* and Source really encouraged us to open. We were one of the first restaurants to embrace the theater community. Today, they come from other theaters all over the city. We get a late crowd, after the shows.

Borderstan: What was Logan Circle like back then?

Mansour: It was a somewhat undesirable place to go out to eat at a restaurant. There were lots of problems back then — prostitution, drug dealing, crime — but we loved the neighborhood and decided to go forward anyway.

Borderstan: What do you think of the changes that have taken place in Logan Circle?

Mansour: It has improved a lot financially since the opening of Whole Foods, which really anchored the neighborhood. I think the police and the city took notice, and it has improved the safety. But now the standard of living has improved so much that the old-time residents can no longer afford the area.

Borderstan: Why do you need to close?

"Borderstan" "14th Street NW" "Play Bill"

Elsayed Mansour at 1409 Playbill Cafe. (Luis Gomez Photos)

Mansour: Our lease was up last year and now we are on a short-term lease, which is very expensive. The building was built as part of a temporary strip mall on what was a parking lot. It was part of an effort by the Logan Circle community to get the owner to help eliminate the drug dealing and crime that was taking place in the lot. I expect they will build a high-rise eventually.

Borderstan: When you find a new location, will you keep the same name and concept?

Mansour: Yes, the same theme. We will just use the number of the new address in front of Playbill Cafe. We have a loyal following and we want them to come back. We have a small 50-seat theater called Black Box and we also started a foundation called Playbill Foundation to support the theater in the future.

Borderstan: When you are not working, what are some of your favorite places in the neighborhood to eat out at or have a drink?

Mansour: It would be unfair to say I have a favorite, I like to support all of the neighborhood restaurants.

*Longtime residents of Logan Circle will recall that Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company was originally located in a warehouse at 14th and Church Streets NW in what is now Homemade Pizza Company and the Lofts 14 Condominium. Woolly Mammoth opened their permanent home at 641 D Street NW, in the Penn Quarter neighborhood in 2005.

by Borderstan.com July 15, 2011 at 9:20 am 0

Meridian Hill Park, Flick, Vileinist

“Slacklining at Meridian Hill Park.” Sunny and slightly cooler weather make it a great weekend to hang out outside. (Photo from Vileinist in the Borderstan Flickr pool)

From Laura Herman of LauraLikesThis. Laura is also a contributor over at Brightest Young Things and you can find her on Twitter @Lmhhabs.

Your complete guide to this weekend in and around Borderstan:

Friday, July 15

Still recovering from last night’s Bastille Day festivities? Kill some time before you, ya know, actually start doing any work today and snag some free tix to Virgin Mobile Free Fest. All you need to do is “like” the Facebook fanpage and click away, beginning at 10 am.

At night, head over to The Black Squirrel (2427 18 St NW) where Ridgewood Social Club will be returning for yet another night of mashup madness. RSC brought the house down over July 4th weekend. I felt like I was back in a sweaty frat house basement, only (a lot) older and (marginally) wiser, and I mean this in the absolute best way possible. Definitely don’t miss this one–the party starts at 10:30 pm. All info is available here.

(more…)

by Borderstan.com June 24, 2011 at 11:53 am 0

DC theaters, Borderstan, Luis Gomez Photos

See what’s playing at the five theaters in the Borderstan area, Thursday through Sunday. (Luis Gomez Photos)

There are shows this weekend at three of the five theaters in the Borderstan area, plus a Friday-night performance at the Lincoln.

25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee at Keegan Theatre on Church Street has been continued for another week, through July 9.

Tonight at the Lincoln Theatre on U Street, catch Banky W Featuring Wizkid & Skales.

The Source Festival runs for two more weekends, on 14th Street at the Source. See Source Festival Opens with 10-Minute Plays.

The History of Kisses and Venus in Fur are at the Studio Theatre on 14th Street.

Theatre J is taking a breather, but the 2011-2012 season begins with Imagining Madoff on August 31.

Find out what is going on at other theaters in the area below the fold:

(more…)

by Borderstan.com May 26, 2011 at 12:00 pm 0

Keegan Theatre at Church Street, "25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee"

“25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” opens June 4 at Keegan Theatre at Church Street. (Image courtesy of Keegan Theatre)

From Jana Petersen

Can you spell F.I.N.A.L.L.Y.? Starting June 4 (for a limited five-week season), the Keegan Theater at Church Street will be running the 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, a six-time nominated Tony Award winning musical.

Directed by Keegan’s Cristina Coakley, Elisa Rosman and Melissa Douglas Bustamante, the musical is the story of five Putnam County kids vying for 1st place, bragging rights, and ultimately a trip to the National Spelling Bee competition. (Overalls, braces, frizzy hair, and tattoo chokers are not part of the admission fee.)

Venus in Fur opened at the the Studio Theater on May 25 and is a David Ives adaptation of Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s 1870s novella. The play is the story of a seemingly eager-to-please woman who is able to manipulate her casting director to take her audition though she is late, and ultimately batter that casting director into submission.

Venus in Fur not only inverts the stereotypical gender roles and dispositions in a relationship, man versus woman, but also, beyond gender, flips the roles of two character types, director versus actress — an outcome that Ives says, “would delight any actor.” Buy your tickets here.

Find out what is going on at other theaters in the area below the fold: (more…)

by Borderstan.com May 5, 2011 at 12:00 pm 0

"National Pastime," Keegan Theatre, Borderstan

"National Pastime" runs through May 14 at the Keegan Theatre at Church Street. (Photo courtesy Keegan Theatre)

From Jana Petersen

This Saturday marks the second to last Saturday to catch National Pastime at Keegan Theatre. Co-directed by Mark Rhea and Susan Marie Rhea and music directed by Jake Null, National Pastime tells the story of WZBQ, a radio station in 1933 Iowa that invents an unbeatable baseball team and broadcasts phony baseball games in order to boost its ratings. Attend the musical to find out what happens when the media catches on to the scandal.

The New Electric Ballroom by Enda Walsh, the last remaining piece of the Enda Walsh festival, will do its final run this Sunday, May 8. The New Electric Ballroom is the story of three aging sisters from a small Irish village who are caught up in stories of the past until their only visitor, a lonely fishmonger, offers the sisters an escape from the stories they’ve let imprison them.

Meanwhile, The Source welcomes The Green Bird to the stage. “This commedia dell’arte fantasia involves a lovesick king, a greedy fortune teller, an insatiable sausage-maker, a seductive statue and a magical green bird. This vibrant world combines philosophical ideas about truth, love, sacrifice and compassion with inventive physical comedy and Tom Teasley’s sensational live music” (Source).

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