by Tim Regan November 16, 2016 at 1:35 pm 0

Photo via Facebook / FreshFarm MarketsLocals can give to the needy while shopping at farmers markets this week.

FreshFarm will hold Thanksgiving food drives at each one of its markets starting today. This is the sixth year the organization has held the donation effort.

Those who want to help out with the drive can give a tax-deductable monetary donation at each of the markets’ orange information tents. Locals can also participate by dropping off pantry items such as flour, sugar, spices, coffee, cooking oil and dried goods.

“We collect  tax-deductible donations from shoppers and spend the money with our farmers and producers on fresh market foods,” FreshFarm wrote on its website. “In 2015 we raised $10,000 from shoppers to spend on local fresh foods, which went to our neighbors in need.”

The drive will be held at the following locations and dates:

  • Foggy Bottom 11/16 benefiting Miriam’s Kitchen
  • Near the White House 11/17 benefiting Thrive DC
  • Penn Quarter 11/17 benefiting Thrive DC
  • H Street NE 11/19 benefiting First Church of Christ Holiness
  • Downtown Silver Spring 11/19 benefiting Shepherd’s Table
  • Dupont Circle 11/20 benefiting D.C. Central Kitchen  and Iona
  • Crystal City 11/22 benefiting Arlington Food Assistance Center

Photo via FreshFarm Markets

by Borderstan.com May 17, 2013 at 11:30 am 0

"Strawberries"

Strawberries are coming and Alejandra has recipes galore. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Alejandra Owens. You can find her at her food blog, One Bite At A Time. Alejandra also writes for City Eats DC, a Food Network site, where you can book dinner reservations. Follow her on Twitter at @frijolita and email her at alejandra[AT]borderstan.com

Last year, the most awful thing happened to me. I was at the grocery store, just weeks after the local strawberry season had ended and I was lamenting the lack of those little red jewels in my life. I was sad. I missed them!

So I bought a pint of the little buggers from The Teet.

Wow, was that a mistake. They were watery, tasteless and mealy. I mean, I didn’t really even understand what mealy felt like in my mouth until that moment. What the heck!? I had been eating grocery store strawberries my whole life (with the rare exception of cartons bought on the side of the road from Mexicans, who crossed the boarder to set up mini market stands — I grew up about 40 minutes from the U.S.-Mexico border) and in that moment, I felt screwed. Had they always tasted like that? Had I elevated myself to the next level of strawberry consciousness with my farmers market shopping ways?

I’m hoping I just landed a bad batch, ’cause as much as I try to shop local and seasonal, there are just moments, there are desserts, that call for strawberries when they’re not in season in like, you know,Pennsylvania!!!

This week’s FreshFarm Markets‘ newsletter mentioned that they would have strawberries from Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania this Saturday and I got tres excited. We can throw a strawberry party now, just so we’re ready.

Here are some strawberry recipes to get you started:

What’s on your market list for this weekend? Don’t forget, if you have questions about the market, just tweet me!

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by Borderstan.com April 27, 2012 at 2:00 pm 1,346 0

"Borderstan""Sparragus"

Asparagus at the farmers markets. (Alejandra Owens)

From Alejandra Owens. You can find her at her food blog, One Bite At A Time. Alejandra also writes for City Eats DC, a Food Network site, where you can book dinner reservations. Follow her on Twitter at @frijolita and email her at alejandra[AT]borderstan.com.

Do you ever wonder where foodie types get all their inspiration? It’s true, there are some among us who walk the stalls of the farmers markets every Sunday positively oozing with culinary inspiration. Some can reach back into the recesses of their minds and pull out recipes, recalling their time at culinary school or a cooking class or some recipe they saw in Gourmet magazine in 1997.

And then there’s the rest of us. Who might need a little prodding, some inspiration and likely a kick in the rear to set us off on our adventures. Having a bit of an insider’s view as to how this cadre of the culinary mafia develops recipes, I’m here to offer you a few tips for where we get our inspiration.

  1. Blogs – There are big national blogs to follow, but I prefer reading DC’s finest first. If you need a list to start with, take a look at our archive of weekly farmers market posts! We try to feature local food blogger’s recipes as often as we can. Don’t just read what they wrote this week though, look back to this month last year, or the year before. Most folks are blogging about seasonal trends, whether they’re from the farmers market or dishes featured in restaurants.
  2. Cookbooks – One of my favorite cookbooks is Alice Waters’ The Art of Simple Food. The reason I love this book so much is for its no muss, no fuss approach to ingredients. When I’m walking around the market, sometimes all I see are ingredients and I need an idea for how I can include them in a larger dish. Waters will help you do just that.
  3. Magazines Online – Gourmet is out of print, Saveur can be expensive or seem out of reach and subscribing to Bon Appetit sounds like a nice idea but you’re probably not going to use it as often as you should. Don’t fret, all these mags have superb online search functions. My first spot for searching recipes online is often Saveur.com. Saveur does a fabulous job of mixing their own articles/recipes with recipes from like-minded bloggers across the country. Also, their recipes are much more accessible and simple than you would think.
  4. Eating Out – Chefs are an artistic lot, so why not leech a little creativity off them? When dining out it’s important to be adventurous – whatever your definition of adventurous is. Even if it’s “not ordering chicken,” it’s important to try something new so you can try new flavors, a new herb or protein and see how one of the pros does it! Don’t be afraid to ask what’s in a dish, or even for the recipe. The truth is, these are aren’t state secrets and most chefs realize you will never make it as well as they do so many are willing to share.
  5. Traveling – My #1 rule for eating when I travel is this: if I can get it at home, I’m not getting it here. Why waste your money when you’re traveling on a chain or eating the same old stuff you get at home? If you’re in Chicago, go look for Chicago-style pizza! If you’re in Tucson, seek out the littlest hole in the wall Mexican food joint you can find. It takes some effort, but I promise, the internet is here to help. And you know, foodie types love telling stories about “that moussaka they had on a tiny island in Greece made by a little old lady” they’re always trying to replicate.
  6. Pinterest – Oh it’s just alllll the rage right now! You’re too cool for Pinterest! I know, you’re a hipster who’s already looking for the next Pinterest. But for the rest of us, this is a wonderful source of ideas and inspiration. Follow your friends, follow your favorite bloggers, search “kale” — there’s a bazillion ways to find new and interesting dishes to make. Heed these warnings though: things will look far more perfect and beautiful on Pinterest than they will in real life, and you do not have to put every dish you make in a mason jar.

I think it goes without saying that inspiration can be found just about anywhere — maybe in some art or from your mom or friends. Sometimes we forget an idea is likely just a tweet, phone call or Google search away.

Where do you guys get your cooking inspiration from? I’m always looking for new places to poke around for recipes and ideas, so please share in the comments! And don’t forget, if you have cooking or market questions, ping me on Twitter — I’m @frijolita.

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by Borderstan.com April 20, 2012 at 2:00 pm 1,245 0

"Borderstan""Onions"

Onions are ready for the season. (Alejandra Owens)

From Alejandra Owens. You can find her at her food blog, One Bite At A Time. Alejandra also writes for City Eats DC, a Food Network site, where you can book dinner reservations. Follow her on Twitter at @frijolita and email her at alejandra[AT]borderstan.com.

Judging from the FreshFarm Markets email newsletter, this would be the week to buy anything and everything green. Arugula, asparagus, kale, salad greens, spinach, stinging nettles, swiss chard, green onions and watercress are all out in abundance. And turnips. They’re not green. They’re white. But they’re awesome.

Aside from the usual “lightly dressed” green salad, there’s a ton of stuff you can make with all the fresh greens popping up at the market. And while I love a good salad – I’m going to ask you all to stretch yourselves some and think beyond the ranch dressing and salad bowl.

You’re gonna get some asparagus and make this Spring Pad Thai, because it’s good to know how to make pad thai. You shouldn’t really be paying for the stuff. Really.

Are you feeling dangerous? Cause I’m feelin’ dangerous. Say it with me now: stinging nettles. If consuming ghost peppers is the sky diving of food, stinging nettles are like rock wall climbing. You feel bad ass when you make and eat them, but really, the risk was minimal all along. Make this lasagna. Brag to your friends on Monday morning.

I kind of hate that kale chips have become this odd dieters’ substitution for potato chips. I love kale chips. I love potato chips. They are totally different. Neither can satisfy a craving for the other, and both require a delicate touch and technique to making the perfect batch. Now is the time to start working on your perfect kale chip.

Finally, what goes better on a bunch of green things than a fried egg? Saute some swiss chard (all that rainbow-veined velvety leafed stuff), spinach, green onions, maybe ramps (throw in some mushrooms maybe), and top with a fried egg, the yolk still all soft and creamy. Add in some rice or quinoa into the mix if you must, but this is the good stuff!

So, who’s hitting the market this Sunday? Want to meet up? We can buy canvas bags full of leafy green things and talk about how we’re going to make it all. Hit me up on Twitter and I’ll see you there!

Related Posts

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by Borderstan.com April 13, 2012 at 10:00 am 1,718 0

"Borderstan""Straberries"

Strawberries are coming and Alejandra has recipes galore.  (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Alejandra Owens. You can find her at her food blog, One Bite At A Time. Alejandra also writes for City Eats DC, a Food Network site, where you can book dinner reservations. Follow her on Twitter at @frijolita and email her at alejandra[AT]borderstan.com

Last year, the most awful thing happened to me. I was at the grocery store, just weeks after the local strawberry season had ended and I was lamenting the lack of those little red jewels in my life. I was sad. I missed them!

So I bought a pint of the little buggers from The Teet.

Wow, was that a mistake. They were watery, tasteless and mealy. I mean, I didn’t really even understand what mealy felt like in my mouth until that moment. What the heck!? I had been eating grocery store strawberries my whole life (with the rare exception of cartons bought on the side of the road from Mexicans, who crossed the boarder to set up mini market stands — I grew up about 40 minutes from the U.S.-Mexico border) and in that moment, I felt screwed. Had they always tasted like that? Had I elevated myself to the next level of strawberry consciousness with my farmers market shopping ways?

I’m hoping I just landed a bad batch, ’cause as much as I try to shop local and seasonal, there are just moments, there are desserts, that call for strawberries when they’re not in season in like, you know, Pennsylvania!!!

This week’s FreshFarm Markets‘ newsletter mentioned that Garner’s Produce would have strawberries at the Penn Quarter market and I got tres excited. I’m not sure if they’ll be at Dupont Circle this Sunday, but you know what, we can throw a strawberry party now, just so we’re ready.

Here are some strawberry recipes to get you started:

What’s on your market list for this weekend? Don’t forget, if you have questions about the market, just tweet me!

Like reading Borderstan’s Food & Drink stories? Get an RSS Feed for the F&E Section, or an RSS Feed for all Borderstan stories.

by Borderstan.com November 4, 2011 at 12:00 pm 1,047 1 Comment

"Borderstan""Markets"

Radishes are at the farmer’s market in the late fall. (Alejandra Owens).

From Ashley Lusk. Check out Ashley’s blog Metropoetrylis. Find her on Twitter at @arlusk or email her at [email protected].

Saturdays: 14 and U Farmers’ Market 9 am to 1 pm… Sundays: Dupont Farmers’s Market 8:30 am to 1 pm.

I like to think of the weeks before Thanksgiving as “practice.” If your family is like mine, expectations run high to make something that can become a new Turkey Day tradition. Get to the farmers’ market this week to do some testing of your own with delicious winter greens and cold weather fruit.

Last year I shook up tradition by making curried cranberry sauce for the family, but with greens looking so good at the market this week, perhaps I’ll “practice” these creamed collard greens from Bon Appetit on myself.

Dupont Circle

The Dupont Circle Market will feature Asian long beans, collards, cranberry shelling beans, turnips, arugula, fennel, cauliflower and apples. You can also pick up a variety of pears including Asian, Bartlett, Comice, Seckel and Bosc.

Also look for sweet potatoes, radishes, carrots, lettuces and beets, as well as broccoli, potatoes, onions, kale, Swiss chard, mushrooms and spaghetti squash.

14th and U

Whisked! has Scalloped Potato Tarts with Asiago cheese, onions and fresh herbs, and homemade Chicken Pot Pies. Pre-order a white, broad-breasted turkey from Truck Patch at the market or pick up fall firewood from the Garner stand. In addition to pears and apples at the market, check out the Kuhn stand for sales on bags of red onions and half price on heirloom pumpkins during the last hour of the market.

Don’t forget, only three weeks remain for the 14 and U Streets NW Farmers’ Market season, so stock up on favorites soon.

by Borderstan.com October 7, 2010 at 10:59 pm 1,244 0

 

Adventures in Shaw

From Alejandra Owens at One Bite At A Time

You don’t need me to tell you that it’s feeling like fall in DC. But maybe you do need a little reminder that the comfort food of fall is back.

Pat over at FreshFarm Markets (that would be Dupont Farmers Market to you) reports there will be chestnuts (not roasting over an open fire), beets, comice pears, apples (I promise not to bombard you with 500 apple recipes), parsnips (very underrated veg IMO), purple kohlrabi (what’s that?) and brussel sprouts (mmm yay!) are all making an appearance this weekend.

Robin at 14th & U Farmers Market gave us an exclusive little preview of some really awesome new stuff making an appearance this weekend:

  • For those with a sweet tooth there will be ginger gelato and Heirloom Apple Cider Sorbetto by Dolcezza and Tiny Carrot Cupcakes at Pecan Meadow made from their own carrots.
  • Coq-au-vin Tortellini (I. Die.), Chestnut and Sausage Soup, and Butternut Squash Soup (that didn’t make it last week).
  • Heirloom squash such as Pink Banana, Marina de Chioggia, and Galuex d’Eysines at Kuhn.
  • Seckel pears and chestnuts now at McCleaf, watercress at Truck Patch, broccoli and cauliflower at Garner.
  • You can pre-order Pecan Meadow’s whole Geese or Boneless Duck Breast.

While we’re talking about pre-ordering birds, check out Florida Girl in DC’s post on pre-ordering your Thanksgiving turkey. Yep. Some of us are already thinking about Thanksgiving.

Finally, here’s a few Fall recipes from your (every friendly) DC Food Bloggers to get you started.

by Borderstan.com September 15, 2009 at 7:26 am 1,179 1 Comment

Fresh produce and fruits at the new farmer's market at 810 Vermont Ave. NW (between H and I Streets). (Photo:Luis Gomez)

Fresh produce and fruits will be at the new farmer’s market at 810 Vermont Ave. NW (between H and I Streets). (Photo: Luis Gomez)

I’ve seen a number of postings and stories about a new farmers’ market coming to a location near The White House. ReadysetDC has a posting, which directed me to FRESHFARM Markets’ Web site to confirm it.

The new farmers’ market, which will be at 810 Vermont Avenue NW (between H and I Streets) will be open on Thursdays from 3 to 7 p.m. It opens this Thursday the 17th and runs through October 29.

Love the evening hours. I live in Borderstan, but commute out to Fairfax County. So, if you live downtown, but don’t work downtown, this is a good weekday market option for you. Google Maps times the walk from the heart of Borderstan to 810 Vermont Avenue as taking about 15 minutes.

FRESHFARM Markets already operates eight farmers’ markets in the “Chesapeake Bay area,” including the Sunday Dupont market on 20th Street NW.

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