by Courtney Brown August 4, 2016 at 4:45 pm 0

Icebergs (Photo via Facebook/National Building Museum)

Residents of two wards will be able to “explore a fantastical glacial sea designed by landscape architects” for free next week.

Ward 2 and 8 Day at the National Building Museum (401 F St. NW) is scheduled for next Tuesday, Aug. 9 from 9-11 a.m., according to the museum’s website.

To get into the exhibit free of charge, residents must bring an ID card that proves they live in either Ward 2 or Ward 8.

More info on “Icebergs” from the museum’s website:

ICEBERGS is built from re-usable construction materials, such as scaffolding and polycarbonate paneling. The 20′ high “water line” allows panoramic views from high above the ocean surface and down below among the towering bergs. The tallest “bergy bit,” at 56′, reaches to the third story balcony of the Museum.

Employees from Daikaya will also be on hand to sling snacks such as Japanese “kakigori” shaved ice.

Photo via Facebook/National Building Museum

by Tim Regan April 26, 2016 at 1:15 pm 0

Sex work focus group flyer(Updated at 8:17 a.m. Wednesday) The organizers of a new study are looking for residents who have been affected by “the presence of sex work” in their neighborhoods.

Researchers from the University of California-Riverside and Georgetown University will hold two focus groups — one in Ward 7 and another in Ward 2 — this Sunday and Monday, May 1 and 2.

(more…)

by Tim Regan December 14, 2015 at 10:15 am 0

Under Thomas CircleDrivers, take note: District Department of Transportation (DDOT) workers will close lanes under Thomas Circle to conduct road surveys for two weeks starting today.

Workers will close eastbound and westbound lanes on Massachusetts Avenue NW under Thomas Circle between 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday for approximately two weeks, causing “moderate” delays, according to the department.

More details on the lane closures from DDOT:

Arrow boards and cones will be used to close the lanes. Only one lane will be closed at one time. These closures are necessary for DDOT to conduct survey work on Massachusetts Avenue, NW, under Thomas Circle.

Moderate delays are anticipated. Motorists are urged to stay alert and to use caution when traveling through the work zones.

Photo via Google Street View

by Tim Regan August 27, 2015 at 10:05 am 0

jackEvans_BorderstanJack Evans wants to take his constituents to a baseball game.

The D.C. Councilmember has put out a call for Ward 2 residents to claim up to two free tickets for an upcoming game between the Nationals and the Atlanta Braves on Sept. 3 at 7:05 p.m.

The tickets will be given away on a first-come-first-serve basis, says Sherri Kimbel, the councilmember’s director of constituent services. Kimbel adds her office plans to give away about 100 tickets.

Ward 2 residents interested in picking up a pair of free tickets should call 202-724-8058 or email Amorde Brabham at [email protected].

by Daniel Levitt July 29, 2015 at 1:30 pm 0

Image via Litter Free DC

D.C. residents can ask members of the Department of Public Works and Metropolitan Police Department questions about keeping the District litter free from the comfort of their computers.

A live webcast will take place on the DPW’s website tomorrow from noon to 1 p.m.

Residents can submit questions to the DPW’s Interim Director Chris Shorter as well as a representative from the MPD’s Litter Enforcement team, as part of the DPW’s Litter Free D.C. campaign.

As the name implies, Litter Free D.C. is a program sponsored by the DPW that aims to eliminate litter from streets in the city.

Future DPW webcasts will cover graffiti, leaf collection, recycling and parking, said DPW Public Affairs Specialist Nancee Lyons.

“We’re always open for topic ideas and encourage residents to let us know what they would like to discuss,” Lyons said.

More information can be found can be found on the DPW website.

Image via Litter Free DC

by Jared Holt July 27, 2015 at 11:30 am 0

The Beach

Ward 2 residents can frolic in a giant ball pit for free tomorrow morning.

From 9 to 11 a.m., residents of Councilmember Jack Evans’ ward can freely enter The BEACH, a National Building Museum (401 F Street NW) exhibit with nearly one million translucent plastic balls and a “shoreline” decked with beach chairs and tables.

Visitors are welcome to dive into the massive ball pit, play beach games like paddleball and bring a book to read in the beach furniture.

Attendees must show a valid form of I.D. at the admissions desk to enter the BEACH. Visitors must use the F Street entrance between 5th and 6th streets.

The event is part of the museum’s Ward Days series.

Photo via Flickr.com/NationalBuildingMuseum

by Borderstan.com December 6, 2012 at 10:00 am 1,216 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com. 

"liquor license"

On December 4, the DC Council took its first vote on overhauling the city’s liquor licensing laws. (Luis Gomez Photos)

On Tuesday the DC Council met to to take the first vote on a controversial bill addressing liquor licensing for local businesses, and residents’ roles in the process. Many issues were on the table regarding liquor licensing, including how long it takes to obtain a license and who can squash it.

The legislation came before the Council following work done by a large task force headed by Councilmember Jim Graham (D-Ward 1). What did happen on Tuesday?

  • The Council passed a provision to get rid of any “Gang of 5” license protest if a venue applying for a license reaches agreement with Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) — essentially giving an ANC first standing in liquor license protests.
  • According to Tim Craig, reporter for The Washington Post, the council defeated Councilmember Cheh’s amendment,which strengthened the ability of five or more residents to protest a neighborhood liquor license. Graham, Orange, Barry, Graham Brown, Evans and Wells voted against the amendment. Alexander, Bowser, Cheh, McDuffie and Mendelson voted for it.
  • The requirement that “Gang of 5” members protesting a liquor license application or renewal live within a 400-foot radius around an establishment was taken out of the bill. (See DC Liquor Board Reaffirms Hank’s Oyster Bar Decision and Poll: Most Readers Say 5 People Not Enough to Protest Liquor Licenses).
  • D.C. Hospitality reports that the Council also approved a measure that requires the city’s Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) Board to act on licensing applications in a quicker time frame — of great importance to businesses that are essentially waiting to open pending approval of a liquor license.
  • And as Dcist reports, sometime next year, liquor stores will be able to open for business on Sundays.

The final vote on the bill is scheduled for Tuesday, December 18.

Large Number of Licenses in Area

There are 1,586 liquor licenses of all types in DC, according to the DC Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration (ABRA). The battles over liquor licenses in the Dupont, Logan and U Street neighborhoods are more easily put into perspective when you look at the numbers — what wards, ANCs and areas have the most liquor licenses. Statistics from ABRA show how dominant our locales are in the ranks of DC’s watering holes: Ward 2 (Dupont-Logan) is home to 40% of all the city’s liquor licenses, followed by Ward 1 (which includes most of the U Street corridor) with 16%. In third place is Ward 6 (Capitol Hill) with 15%. It’s important to point out that Ward 2 includes Georgetown, in addition to Dupont-Logan and areas south of Dupont Circle. Ward 1 also includes Adams Morgan and Columbia Heights. Other DC Wards: Ward 3 has about 11% of all licenses; Ward 5 has 7%; Ward 4 has 6%; Ward 7 about 3%; and Ward 8 about 2.5% of all the city’s liquor licenses.

Licenses in Local ANCs

A look at number of licenses by Advisory Neighborhood Commission level is more revealing. ANC 2B/Dupontis home to 14.44% of all liquor licenses in the city (229) — keep in mind that the boundaries of ANC 2B extend well south of Dupont Circle and reach Pennsylvania Avenue at some points. (See DC Liquor Licenses by the Numbers: Ward 2, 40% and Ward 1, 16%.)

ANC 2F (Logan Circle and a big chunk of 14th Street NW) has 111 liquor licenses, about 7% of the city’s total. ANC 1B has 91 licenses, about 6% of all licenses in DC — 1B includes the U Street corridor and large swath of territory to the north plus Howard University. Together, these three ANCs are home to 431 of 1,586 licenses, about 27% of the city’s total. Throw in ANC 2C/Shaw and you have another 7% of all liquor licenses in DC. How many are in ANC 1C, home to Adams Morgan? That ANC has 84 licenses, about 5% of all the DC liquor licenses.

The exact numbers are as follows:

ANC # ABC Licenses % of All DC Licenses
ANC 1B (U Street corridor and Columbia Heights) 91 5.74%
ANC 2B (Dupont Circle) 229 14.44%
ANC 2F (Logan Circle) 113 7.12%
ANC 2C (Shaw) 111 7.00%

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by Borderstan.com December 4, 2012 at 4:00 pm 1,018 0

"Garrison"

Garrison Elementary. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com. 

On Wednesday, December 5, DC Public Schools (DCPS) will hold a community meeting on the proposed school consolidation and reorganization plan for Wards 1-4. The meeting, which will take place from 6 to 8 pm at Brightwood Education Campus (1300 Nicholson Street NW), will provide an opportunity for parents and community members to provide feedback on the proposed plans.

Prior to the community meeting, Garrison parents, community members and supporters will meet at Garrison between 4 and 5:30 pm to have a group discussion; a light supper will be served.

Childcare will be available for the evening’s meeting and Garrison PTA will provide buses between Garrison and the community meeting location.

Those who are interested in participating in the evening’s meeting and pre-meeting activities must RSVP online.

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by Borderstan.com November 26, 2012 at 4:00 pm 1,525 0

"Garrison"

Garrison Elementary School is on the list of  Ward 2 public schools to be closed. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com. 

Even though DC Public Schools (DCPS) announced the closing of 20 schools nearly two weeks ago, Borderstan residents, parents, fauclty and community members still remain shocked by one on the list: Garrison Elementary.

The school at 1200 S Street NW, is home to 237 students in the Logan Circle/U Street neighborhood in Ward 2.

The plan, which also proposes closing two additional schools in Ward 2, including Shaw at Garnet-Patterson Middle School (2001 10th Street NW) and Francis-Stevens Educational Campus (2425 N Street NW), aims to consolidate schools to better utilize the city’s facilities and to work more efficiently.

“We have too many schools that are too small to support our students’ needs,” said DC Public Schools (DCPS) Chancellor Kaya Henderson in video promoting the plan.

However, parents, community members and faculty at Garrison do not feel the same way.

Reaction from Parents, Public Officials

“I am just extremely disappointed and confused by the whole thing,” said Jeff Shank, a parent to a preschool student at Garrison. “I feel like [closing Garrison] was not well thought out.”

Since Henderson’s announcement, a petition opposing the closing of Garrison has received more than 375 signatures, Ward 2 Councilmember Jack Evans made a public statement of disapproval and letters of opposition from ANC 1B and ANC 2F have been sent to Mayor Vincent Gray and Henderson.

“What doesn’t make sense is why they would close an elementary school in an area that is experiencing such a big growth in population,” said Sara Williams, another parent at Garrison and a seven-year Logan Circle resident.

Garrison is currently close to full capacity, and DCPS projects the neighborhood will see an increase of at least 125 children by 2015.

“We’ve seen the change in the neighborhood and the growing number of families, and [closing Garrison] seems very short-sighted of them, based on what’s coming in to the area,” said Williams.

A Vacant Building?

Other members of the community are concerned with the future plans for Garrison if the school does close and the building goes vacant.

“Many of us are all too familiar with crime, theft and neighborhood violence,” wrote ANC IB members in a letter to Gray and Henderson. “Another empty, dark area is asking for trouble and will likely deter people from either moving to the neighborhood, increase people’s unease about the adjacent streets and cause increased stress on the already strained police presence.”

Shank thinks that even if a vacant Garrison is eventually turned into a useful space, it will still cost DCPS lots of money to change it into something else.

“Closing Garrison leaves us with three abandoned schools in the neighborhood,” said Shank, who is also apprehensive about rebuilding a new community at Seaton, the school to which Garrison students will be redirected.

“Over the past three years, the parents and community really put a lot of work into building Garrison,” said Shank. “And now many of us feel like we have to start over.”

Garrison PTA member, Ann McLeod seconded Shank’s opinion. “Time and again, the ANC and local neighborhood associations have worked with – and have become increasingly excited about – the potential for Garrison to become a great school,” said McLeod.

“After three years of hard work led by parents and community members, and with new school leadership appointed less than three months ago, many essential elements are now in place to steepen Garrison’s trajectory to becoming one of the top schools in the District,” read the letter from the local ANCs to the city officials.

Melissa McClam, a former graduate and current parent at Garrison also opposes its closing, based on the school’s ability to foster a variety of races, ethnicities, cultures and needs.

The student body at Garrison is 66 percent black, 26 percent Latino and 6 percent white. Additionally, 23 percent of students at Garrison have special needs, and Garrison has an autism-specific classroom.

“Garrison is also special because it creates opportunities for families of different backgrounds to meet other parents and build relationships,” said McClam.

“Over the past few years, I’ve talked to several local parents of young kids who have just started considering sending their children to Garrison, ” said Williams. “And now they are closing – it just doesn’t make any sense.”

Public Hearings

Since the announcement, Henderson has been adamant on obtaining community feedback to the closings, and is working with residents to remedy concerns. DCPS has held two DC Council hearings and will hold four additional community meetings for all eight wards over the next week.

If Garrison does close (the closure is not yet eminent), officials have started talking about the school reopening in the future.

“They keep talking about a reopening, and it takes a lot to reopen a school once it closes,” said Williams. “And why would I send my kid there if DCPS has already turned its back on the school once before?”

As for now, many parents are reconsidering their allegiance to DCPS if Garrison does close. When asked if she would still send her child to Seaton if Garrison closes, Williams responded, “You know, I am really hesitant.”

Colin Hill, principal of Garrison Elementary, declined a comment on the closing of the school, but acknowledged “the emotional nature of this process and [his] place in it.” Hill referred us to Melissa Salmanowitz, director of press for DCPS, for comment.

Salmanowitz referred us to the DCPS link for frequently asked questions.

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by Borderstan.com November 26, 2012 at 8:00 am 1,056 1 Comment

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com. 

Parents, residents and community members of Ward 2 are holding a town hall meeting on Tuesday, November 27 at the Francis-Stevens Educational Center (2425 N Street NW).

The meeting is to discuss the proposed closings of Francis-Stevens, as announced by DC Public Schools. The meeting is open to the public and will begin at 6:30 pm.

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by Borderstan.com October 31, 2012 at 5:00 pm 1,122 0

"ward 2"

Jack Jacobson and Mary Lord. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com. 

After this November’s election, Ward 2 could have two members on the DC State Board of Education.

Jack Jacobson is running unopposed for the Ward 2 seat on the Board, and Mary Lord, the current Ward 2 member on the State Board of Education, is running for the Board’s At-Large seat. Lord is facing Marvin Tucker on the November 6 ballot.

In an article published on October 28, The Washington Post endorsed Lord, saying she “deserves [the] election in her at-large bid” since “she understands the role of the state board and has smart ideas on how to sustain school reform.”

According to Lord, Ward 2 has some of the city’s highest-performing schools in the city. “Indeed, we’re a beacon of excellence and and an example of the benefits of school choice and how community involvement can support and sustain strong neighborhood traditional public schools,” said Lord. “Ward 2’s State Board members are well prepared to lead the way forward and ensure all kids, no matter where they live, receive a top-notch public education.”

DC Public Schools in Ward 2 include:

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by Borderstan.com August 23, 2012 at 12:00 pm 0

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

"Weekend"

Jack Jacobson will host a beauty night at Salon Rouge and a happy hour at Stoney’s on Friday, August 24. (Luis Gomez Photos)

This weekend is all about beautifying yourself and DC’s public schools, while getting to know local politicians and community members.

On Saturday, August 25, get involved in your community and help to make the first day of school the best it can be for local students! From 8 am until 1 pm, volunteers from across the DC metro area will help spruce up the city’s schools by participating in DCPS’s Annual Beautification Day. Sign-up as an individual or a group by calling (202) 724-4881 or via email at [email protected].

Actually, on Friday, August 24, start your weekend off right with a blowout, drinks and appetizers at Salon Rouge (636 17th Street NW). Ladies are invited to the event (from 7:30 until 10 pm) with a $25 contribution to Jack Jacobson for DC. Meanwhile, the gentlemen are invited to a community happy hour at Stoney’s (1433 P Street NW) from 5 until 8 pm.

Have kids? Don’t worry. RSVPs will be notified in advance of two local homes in the Dupont/Logan Circle areas with experienced sitters, courtesy of Jack Jacobson for DC.

More information on the evening’s events is available on the Facebook page. Those needing complimentary sitters please RSVP with an email to [email protected].

Jack Jacobson is currently the Dupont Circle Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner for ANC 2B-04, and is running for State Board of Education for Ward 2.

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by Borderstan.com June 16, 2012 at 3:01 pm 1,574 2 Comments

From Matt Rhoades. Email him at matty[AT]borderstan.com.

In a change of plans, Mary Lord announced Friday that she will run for an At-Large seat to the DC State Board of Education, instead of seeking re-election for the Ward 2 seat on the Board. The DC Board of Elections reported this week that Marvin Tucker also picked up petitions for the At-Large Education Board seat. Both Lord and Tucker picked up nominating petitions Friday, according to the DC Board of Elections.

In his June 10 fundraising report to the DC Office of Campaign Finance, Jack Jacobson reported raising $18,216 for his race to win the Ward 2 DC State Board of Education seat. Lord’s decision leaves Jack Jacobson as the only announced candidate for the Ward 2 Education Board seat.

"Borderstan""Jack Jacobson"

Jack Jacobson. (Luis Gomez Photos)

As Washington Post political columnist Mike DeBonis noted Wednesday about Jacobon’s fundraising, he “has built quite the war chest in his nonpartisan bid to unseat State Board of Education member Mary Lord. His $18,216 on hand is particularly impressive considering SBOE races have a $200 donation limit.”

Jacobson represents District 4 on Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) 2B, which covers the Dupont Circle area.

In his Friday statement, Jacobson said the following about Lord: “An inaugural member of the board, Mary has been a valuable asset to me in my capacity as an Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner in Dupont Circle (2B04). Her passion for a top-quality education for all District of Columbia students is undeniable. The possibility of two sitting board members, well versed with the issues facing Ward 2 schools, makes me hopeful that significant improvements across the entire school system are within reach. I welcome the opportunity to work with Mary in the near future.”

DC school board elections are non-partisan — candidates do not run in the primaries on April 3 for party nominations. School board seats are filled in the general election on November 6.

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by Borderstan.com May 31, 2012 at 11:00 am 0

"Kid Playing"

Jack Jacobson hosts Kiddy Happy Hour at Century 21 Redwood Realty on Friday evening. ( Luis Gomez Photos)

From Rachel Nania. Check out her blog, Sear, Simmer & Stir. Follow Nania on Twitter @rnania, email her at rachel[AT]borderstan.com.

On Friday, June 1, Jack Jacobson, candidate for the Ward 2 State Board of Education seat, will host a Kiddy Happy Hour to discuss concerns and share ideas on how to improve schools in Ward 2 and across the city.

This event – which will take place at Century 21 Redwood Realty (1701 Q Street NW) from 5 to 8 pm – is open to all parents and community members involved, and invested, in the neighborhood school system. Free childcare will be provided so that attendees can participate as much as possible!

Jacobson announced his candidacy against incumbent Mary Lord in March. He is a member of Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2B/Dupont, representing District 4. The school board elections are non-partisan; election day is November 6.

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by Borderstan.com May 2, 2012 at 12:00 pm 2,216 1 Comment

"Borderstan"

Ward 2 is home to 40% of all DC liquor licenses. One-third of all licenses are in four local Advisory Neighborhood Commissions. (Luis Gomez Photos)

From Alden Leonard. Contact him at alden[AT]borderstan.com and follow him @aldenleonard on Twitter.

The onerous process of obtaining a DC liquor license is a common complaint among business owners — although you might find more varied opinions among some residents. The process often involves reaching a formal Voluntary Agreement (VA) between a business, groups of residents, Advisory Neighborhood Commissions (ANCs) and community organizations — which often set limitations on hours of operation, serving of alcohol on outdoor patio areas and more.

There are 1,586 liquor licenses of all types in DC, according to the DC Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration (ABRA). The battles over liquor licenses in the Dupont, Logan and U Street neighborhoods are more easily put into perspective when you look at the numbers — what wards, ANCs and areas have the most liquor licenses.

Most of the Borderstan area is in Ward 2 (Dupont-Logan) while the remainder is around the U Street corridor in Ward 1. This explains why the agendas of ANCs 2B, 2F and 1B often include long lists of items related to liquor licenses.

Given the proximity of our neighborhoods to downtown DC, and the booming residential-commercial market in the area, the numbers really shouldn’t be surprising. The area has some of the city’s most vibrant commercial districts — Connecticut Avenue, 18th Street, 17th Street, 14th Street, U Street and 9th Street NW.

Licenses by Ward

Statistics from ABRA show how dominant our locales are in the ranks of DC’s watering holes: Ward 2 is home to 40% of all the city’s liquor licenses, followed by Ward 1 with 16%. In third place is Ward 6 (Capitol Hill) with 15%. It’s important to point out that Ward 2 includes Georgetown, in addition to Dupont-Logan and areas south of Dupont Circle. Ward 1 also includes Adams Morgan and Columbia Heights. Other DC Wards: Ward 3 has about 11% of all licenses; Ward 5 has 7%; Ward 4 has 6%; Ward 7 about 3%; and Ward 8 about 2.5% of all the city’s liquor licenses.

Licenses in Local ANCs

A look at number of licenses by Advisory Neighborhood Commission level is more revealing. ANC 2B/Dupont is home to 14.44% of all liquor licenses in the city (229) — keep in mind that the boundaries of ANC 2B extend well south of Dupont Circle and reach Pennsylvania Avenue at some points.

ANC 2F (Logan Circle and a big chunk of 14th Street NW) has 111 liquor licenses, about 7% of the city’s total. ANC 1B has 91 licenses, about 6% of all licenses in DC — 1B includes the U Street corridor and large swath of territory to the north plus Howard University. Together, these three ANCs are home to 431 of 1,586 licenses, about 27% of the city’s total. Throw in ANC 2C/Shaw and you have another 7% of all liquor licenses in DC.

How many are in ANC 1C, home to Adams Morgan? That ANC has 84 licenses, about 5% of all the DC liquor licenses.

The exact numbers are as follows:

ANC # ABC Licenses % of All DC Licenses
ANC 1B (U Street corridor and Columbia Heights) 91 5.74%
ANC 2B (Dupont Circle) 229 14.44%
ANC 2F (Logan Circle) 113 7.12%
ANC 2C (Shaw) 111 7.00%

 

That means more than one-third of all DC ABC licenses are held by businesses in Borderstan. So why do I end up at the same two bars every weekend?

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